Rolf Vinebrooke, PhD, MSc, BSc, BFA

Professor, Faculty of Science - Biological Sciences

Contact

Professor, Faculty of Science - Biological Sciences
Email
rolf@ualberta.ca
Phone
(780) 492-1870
Address
2-271 Centennial Ctr For Interdisciplinary SCS II
11335 Saskatchewan Drive NW
Edmonton AB
T6G 2H5

Overview

Research
Current Research Interests

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My research group focuses on the cumulative impacts of multiple environmental stressors on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in mountain, boreal, and arctic lakes. In particular, we are interested in the ecological mechanisms that regulate the resistance of ecosystems and their recovery from stressors, such as climate change, acidic nitrogen deposition, stratospheric ozone depletion and increased ultraviolet-B radiation, and invasive species. We use lake/pond surveys, time-series analysis of whole-lake studies, paleolimnology, and mesocosm experiments to develop and test hypotheses regarding synergistic or antagonistic interactions among these stressors and their net impacts on primary producers and consumers. In addition, we are conducting experimental re-introductions of extirpated species to determine restoration strategies for damaged freshwater ecosystems. Also, we are examining how terrestrial inputs subsidize the productive capacity of boreal and mountain lakes.

Dr Vinebrooke is a participant in the Land Reclamation International Graduate School (LRIGS) program sponsored by NSERC CREATE.

Courses

BIOL 332 - Community Ecology

Principles of community ecology, applied to plants and animals. The nature of communities, functional groups and rarity; niche theory and competition; disturbance and other alternatives to competition; food webs (predation, herbivory and disease); diversity (determinants, functional consequences and gradients); island communities. Prerequisites: BIOL 208; STAT 151 or SCI 151; and any one of MATH 113, 114, 115, 120, 125 or SCI 100. May not be taken for credit if credit already obtained in ZOOL 332.

Fall Term 2020
BOT 330 - Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function of Algae

The remarkable biodiversity of algae provides the foundation for most aquatic ecosystems around the world. This course emphasizes the evolution, taxonomy, and ecology of major groups of algae to illustrate relationships between their form and function in pristine and polluted environments. Laboratories will focus on the taxonomic diversity of algae through the use of field surveys of local streams and lakes, and experiments using our extensive algal culture collection. Prerequisite: 200-level Biology course. Both BOT 205 and BIOL 208 recommended. Offered in alternate years.

Winter Term 2021

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