Tracy Raivio

Professor, Faculty of Science - Biological Sciences
Associate Chair, Faculty of Science - Biological Sciences

Contact

Professor, Faculty of Science - Biological Sciences
Email
tracy.raivio@ualberta.ca
Phone
(780) 492-3491
Address
6-033 Centennial Ctr For Interdisciplinary SCS II
11335 Saskatchewan Drive NW
Edmonton AB
T6G 2H5

Associate Chair, Faculty of Science - Biological Sciences
Phone
(780) 492-1257
Address
CW405 Bio Science - Centre Wing
11355 - Saskatchewan Drive
Edmonton AB
T6G 2E9

Overview

Research
In the Raivio lab we are interested in understanding how microbial cells sense and adjust to environmental changes.  Our model system is the Cpx envelope stress response of the genetically amenable organism Escherichia coli.  The CpxA sensor kinase and the CpxR response regulator regulate the Cpx stress response and are members of the two-component regulator family, the largest class of signal transduction proteins in nature.  CpxA senses misfolded proteins in the bacterial periplasm and transduces this information to CpxR, which mediates an adaptive response by changing the expression of several hundred genes.  We use genetic, molecular biological, biochemical, structural, and whole genome gene expression technology to study the mechanisms used by CpxA to sense misfolded proteins and to understand how the downstream targets of the Cpx response lead to amelioration of stress.  Recently, we have shown that one mechanism of Cpx-mediated stress relief involves ridding the envelope of nonessential protein complexes.  These include virulence determinants in enteropathogenic E. coli, a major cause of infantile diarrhea.  These exciting results suggest that the Cpx response may represent an excellent target for the development of novel therapeutic agents.  We expect our work to inform us about how bacteria grow and thrive in the environment, how they cause infections, and how we can engineer them to perform beneficial processes.

Courses

GENET 415 - Current Topics in Bacterial Genetics

The goal of the course is to build knowledge about conserved, fundamental cellular processes uncovered using genetic approaches to study bacteria and to develop an appreciation for the application of this information to the development of technology and the understanding of human diseases. Prerequisites: Two GENET 300 level courses or MICRB 316 and one GENET 300 level course; this course is normally recommended for fourth-year students. Credit cannot be obtained for both GENET 415 and 515.

Fall Term 2020
GENET 515 - Advanced Current Topics in Bacterial Genetics

The goal of the course is to build knowledge about conserved, fundamental cellular processes uncovered using genetic approaches to study bacteria and to develop an appreciation for the application of this information to the development of technology and the understanding of human diseases. Scheduled classes are the same as GENET 415, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both GENET 415 and 515.

Fall Term 2020

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