Carol Frost, PhD, MSc, BSc

AssistProf, Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sci - Renewable Resources Dept

Contact

AssistProf, Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sci - Renewable Resources Dept
Phone
(780) 492-1227
Address
230D Earth Sciences Building
11223 Saskatchewan Drive NW
Edmonton AB
T6G 2E3

Overview

About

I study how anthropogenic disturbances such as land management activities and invasive species impact biodiversity and species interactions, and how these changes to biotic communities in turn affect ecosystem processes, such as nutrient and energy flow through food webs, organic matter decomposition, plant pollination, and seed dispersal. My particular focus is on arthropods and their direct and indirect interactions, and in particular, taxa whose direct interactions with other species can be feasibly detected and quantified, such as plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions, ant-plant interactions, bee/wasp-parasitoid interactions, and plant-pollinator interactions.


Education

2014 PhD in Ecology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand

2009 MSc in Entomology, McGill University, Montréal, Canada

2006 BSc in Animal Biology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada



Research
Publications


Frost, C.M., Allen, W.J., Courchamp, F., Jeschke, J.M., Saul, W.-C., and Wardle, D.A. 2019. Using network theory to understand and predict biological invasions. Trends in Ecology & Evolution (Online early. DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2019.04.012)


Peralta, G., Frost, C.M., and Didham, R.K. 2018. Plant, herbivore and parasitoid community composition in native Nothofagaceae forests vs. exotic pine plantations. Journal of Applied Ecology (Online early).

Peralta, G., Frost, C.M., Didham, R.K., Rand, T.A., and Tylianakis, J.M. 2017. Non-random food-web assembly at habitat edges increases connectivity and functional redundancy. Ecology 98: 995-1005.

Frost, C.M., Peralta, G., Rand, T.A., Didham, R.K., Varsani, A., and Tylianakis, J.M. 2016. Apparent competition drives community-wide parasitism rates and changes in host abundance across ecosystem boundaries. Nature Communications 7:12644 doi: 10.1038/ncomms12644.

Rohr, R.P., Saavedra, S., Peralta, G., Frost, C.M., Bersier, L-F., Bascompte, J., and Tylianakis, J.M. 2016. Persist of produce: a community trade-off tuned by species evenness. American Naturalist 188: 411-422.

Frost, C.M., Didham, R.K., Rand, T.A., Peralta, G., and Tylianakis, J.M. 2015. Community-level net spillover of natural enemies from managed to natural forest. Ecology 96: 193-202.

Peralta, G., Frost, C.M., Didham, R.K., Varsani, A., and Tylianakis, J.M. 2015. Phylogenetic diversity and coevolutionary signals among trophic levels change across a habitat edge. Journal of Animal Ecology 84: 364-372.

Peralta, G., Frost, C.M., Rand, T.A., Didham, R.K. and Tylianakis, J.M. 2014. Complementarity and redundancy of interactions enhance attack rates and spatial stability in host-parasitoid food webs. Ecology 95: 1888-1896.

Frost, C.M., Graham, A.K., and Spence, J.R. 2013. Abiotic conditions rather than resource availability cues determine aerial dispersal behaviour in spiderlings of Dolomedes triton (Araneae: Pisauridae). Canadian Entomologist 145: 29-39.

Courses

REN R 364 - Principles of Managing Natural Diversity

Introduction to the theoretical foundation for conservation science. Elements of population, community and landscape ecology will be reviewed, and their application to realworld challenges discussed. Objective is to provide students with the scientific tools to evaluate and develop conservation strategies for maintaining diversity in human-altered systems. Ethical and philosophical aspects of the sociopolitical arena in which conservation decisions are made and implemented are also explored. Not to be taken if credit received for ENCS 364 or BIOL 367. Prerequisites: *60, and BIOL 208 or (BIOL 108 and REN R 110).

Winter Term 2022
REN R 402A - Directed Research in Renewable Resources

Directed research, with the intent of preparing the student for graduate studies. Generally undertaken in the fourth year of study, over the course of the fall and winter terms and results in an undergraduate thesis. Students wishing to enrol must obtain permission from an instructor, as well as the Associate Chair, Undergraduate, Department of Renewable Resources. Prerequisite: *60 and consent of instructor.

Fall Term 2021
REN R 402B - Directed Research in Renewable Resources

Directed research, with the intent of preparing the student for graduate studies. Generally undertaken in the fourth year of study, over the course of the fall and winter terms and results in an undergraduate thesis. Students wishing to enrol must obtain permission from an instructor, as well as the Associate Chair, Undergraduate, Department of Renewable Resources. Prerequisite: *60 and consent of instructor.

Winter Term 2022
REN R 501 - Topics in Renewable Resources

Directed study in the multiple aspects of renewable resources. Open to fourth year or graduate students upon consent of instructor.

Fall Term 2021
REN R 581 - Introduction to Exploratory Data Analysis

Methods for exploring, analyzing and presenting data. Data organization, outlier identification, transformations. Data displays for grouped, bivariate, and time series data. Summary statistics for parametric and non-parametric data. Concept of standard errors and confidence intervals. Design of scientific tables, two-way tables. Participants learn how to generate publication-quality graphs and tables with open-source software packages.

Fall Term 2021
REN R 582 - Elementary Statistics for Applied Sciences

Concepts of inferential statistics and null hypothesis testing, statistical versus scientific hypothesis testing, problem formulation, assumptions, and interpretation. One- and two-sample inferences for population means and proportions, one and two-way analysis of variance, linear correlation and regression, classical non-parametric statistics. Participants will gain general statistical literacy and learn how to implement common statistical tests with open-source software packages.

Fall Term 2021
REN R 765 - Principles of Managing Natural Diversity

) Introduction to the theoretical foundation for conservation science. Elements of population, community and landscape ecology will be reviewed, and their application to realworld challenges discussed. Objective is to provide students with the scientific tools to evaluate and develop conservation strategies for maintaining diversity in human-altered systems. Ethical and philosophical aspects of the sociopolitical arena in which conservation decisions are made and implemented are also explored. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 364.

Winter Term 2022
REN R 906A - Research Project

The final research project that comprises REN R 906 is a final capping exercise for the degrees of MAg and MF. Its practical and professional focus should integrate the core areas of study in the program. The successful completion of the project entails (1) a research topic approved by the supervisor; (2) the presentation of a draft research proposal; and (3) the presentation of the research as a written document to the supervisor. The project may take the form of any of the following: (1) a formal analysis of management practice, organizational processes or policy; (2) a formative or summative evaluation of a research project or program; (3) a case study, using secondary documents, survey data, or interviews; or (4) replication of a previous study, with either the introduction of a new variable or an analysis in a changed context.

Fall Term 2021
REN R 906B - Research Project

The final research project that comprises REN R 906 is a final capping exercise for the degrees of MAg and MF. Its practical and professional focus should integrate the core areas of study in the program. The successful completion of the project entails (1) a research topic approved by the supervisor; (2) the presentation of a draft research proposal; and (3) the presentation of the research as a written document to the supervisor. The project may take the form of any of the following: (1) a formal analysis of management practice, organizational processes or policy; (2) a formative or summative evaluation of a research project or program; (3) a case study, using secondary documents, survey data, or interviews; or (4) replication of a previous study, with either the introduction of a new variable or an analysis in a changed context.

Winter Term 2022

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