R. Glen Uhrig, PhD, MSc

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Science - Biological Sciences

Contact

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Science - Biological Sciences
Phone
(780) 492-3088
Address
5-106 Centennial Ctr For Interdisciplinary SCS II
11335 Saskatchewan Drive NW
Edmonton AB
T6G 2H5

Overview

About

Plants regulate cellular processes based on the presence or absence of light through a combination of anticipatory (circadian) and reactive (light responsive) mechanisms. Together, these mechanisms allow plants to dynamically adapt to their daily environment as well as signal developmental events (e.g. flowering). Much of our knowledge regarding diurnal regulation of plant cell processes has been derived through transcriptomics. To date, the extent to which diurnal plant cell regulation is controlled by changes in protein abundance and/or post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) remains poorly understood.​ We currently employ quantitative proteomics to examine the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana from a systems perspective, with identified targets of interest further investigated using a combination of molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry as well as targeted proteomics.

Courses

BIOL 343 - Techniques for Macromolecular Characterization

Critical discussion and use of techniques for characterizing macromolecules from prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. This course provides the theoretical and hands-on experience required to use classic and cutting-edge technologies to characterize the properties of these macromolecules. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 and consent of instructor. Credit can only be obtained for one of BIOL 343 or 543 or MICRB 343 or 345.

Winter Term 2021
BIOL 543 - Advanced Techniques for Macromolecular Characterization

Critical discussion and use of techniques for characterizing macromolecules from prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. This course provides the theoretical and hands-on experience required to use classic and cutting-edge technologies to characterize the properties of these macromolecules. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Lectures, assignments and exams are the same as BIOL 343 with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit can only be obtained for one of BIOL 343 or 543 or MICRB 343 or 345.

Winter Term 2021
BOT 380 - Drug Plants

Survey of historical and current use of important drug-producing plants. Evaluation of the chemistry and physiology of biologically active compounds from poisonous, analgesic, and hallucinogenic plants, and the current uses of such plant products. Use of plant biotechnology to develop drug-producing plants. Prerequisite: a 200-level Biological Sciences course or BIOCH 200. BOT 205 recommended.

Winter Term 2021
BOT 600 - Seminar in Plant Biology

Credit for this course may be obtained more than once.

Fall Term 2020

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Scholarly Activities

Research - Research Interest

Plants regulate cellular processes based on the presence or absence of light through a combination of anticipatory (circadian) and reactive (light responsive) mechanisms. Together, these mechanisms allow plants to dynamically adapt to their daily environment as well as signal developmental events (e.g. flowering). Much of our knowledge regarding diurnal regulation of plant cell processes has been derived through transcriptomics. To date, the extent to which diurnal plant cell regulation is controlled by changes in protein abundance and/or post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) remains poorly understood.​ We currently employ quantitative proteomics to examine the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana from a systems perspective, with identified targets of interest further investigated using a combination of molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry as well as targeted proteomics.