Madeline Toubiana

Assistant Professor, Department of Strategy, Entrepreneurship and Management

Contact

Assistant Professor, Department of Strategy, Entrepreneurship and Management
Phone
(780) 492-5628
Address
3-21D Business Building
11203 Saskatchewan Drive NW
Edmonton AB
T6G 2R6

Overview

About

Madeline Toubiana is Assistant Professor of Strategy, Entrepreneurship and Management at the University of Alberta. She is also a research fellow of the Community Impact Research Program at Queen’s University, and the associate director of the Canadian Centre for Corporate Social Responsibility.

She studies what stalls and supports social change and innovation. More specifically, she examines the role of emotions, institutional processes, and stigmatization in influencing the dynamics of social change. While she explores change processes in large organizations and institutions, like in academia, most of her research examines how marginalized and/or stigmatized actors can be better included in change processes, and what might support them in doing so. As such, some of her previous and current work has studied social enterprises, the prison system, the sex trade, unemployment, non-profit organizations, and taxi-driving. Her most recent work has begun to explore the role of entrepreneurship in supporting destigmatization and social change for individuals facing extreme stigma and discrimination.

She is on the editorial review board for Academy of Management Journal and Organization Studies.


Research

Selected Publications

Books

Zietsma, C., Toubiana, M., Voronov, M., & Roberts, A. E. (2019) Emotions in Organization Theory. Cambridge University Press.

Peer-reviewed journals

Ruebottom, T. Voronov, M., Buchanan, S., and Toubiana, M. (conditionally accepted) Voyeuristic businesses: The impact of transgression on value creation. Academy of Management Review.

Lounsbury, M., Steele, C., Wang, M., and Toubiana, M. (forthcoming) New Directions in the study of institutional logics: from tools to phenomena. Annual Review of Sociology.

Phung, K., Buchanan, S., Toubiana, M., Ruebottom, T., and Turchick-Hakak, L. (forthcoming). When stigma doesn’t transfer: Stigma deflection and occupational stratification in the sharing economy. Journal of Management Studies.

Ruebottom, T. and Toubiana, M. (forthcoming) Constraints and opportunities of stigma: Entrepreneurial emancipation in the sex industry. Academy of Management Journal.

Toubiana, M. (forthcoming) Once in orange, always in orange?  Identity paralysis and the enduring influence of institutional logics on identity. Academy of Management Journal.

Zhang, R., Toubiana, M. Wang, M., Ruebottom, T., and Greenwood, R. (forthcoming) Beyond levels: Advancing research on stigma and its management. Academy of Management Annals.

Steele, C.W.J., Hannigan, T.R., Glaser, V.L., Toubiana, M., & Gehman, J. (2020) Macrofoundations: Exploring the institutionally situated nature of activity. Research in the Sociology of Organizations, 68: 1-16

Steele, C., Toubiana, M. and Greenwood, R. (2020). Why worry? Celebrating and reformulating “integrative institutionalism”. Research in the Sociology of Organizations, 65B, 353-370.

Zietsma, C., and Toubiana, M. (2018). The Constitutive, the energetic and the valuable: Exploring the impact and importance of studying emotions. Organization Studies, 39, 427-443.

Toubiana, M., Greenwood, R., and Zietsma, C. (2017). Beyond ethos: Outlining an alternate trajectory for emotional competence and investment. Academy of Management Review, 42, 551-556.

Toubiana, M., Oliver, C. and Bradshaw, P. (2017) Beyond differentiation and integration: The challenges of managing internal complexity in federations. Organization Studies, 38, 1013-1037.

Toubiana, M., and Zietsma, C. (2017) The message is on the wall: Emotions, social media, and the dynamics of institutional complexity. Academy of Management Journal, 60, 922-953. *SSRN top ten download for new paper in emotions and cognition April 2016-June 2016.

Toubiana, M. (2014) Business pedagogy for social justice? An exploratory investigation of business faculty perspectives of social justice in business education. Management Learning, 45 (1), 81 – 102.

Toubiana, M., and Yair, G. (2012). The salvation of meaning in Peter Drucker's oeuvre. Journal of Management History, 18(2): 178 - 199.

Courses

SMO 438 - Managing Public, Not-for-Profit Organizations

Many management ideas and practices are derived from private, for-profit organizations. This course examines some of the issues confronting management in the public, voluntary and not-for-profit sectors, for example, health, education, charities, churches, cultural organization and the arts, community groups, aid agencies, etc. It addresses the issues of to what extent and how management in these types of organizations is different from the dominant private sector view of management; the extent to which practices from one sector may be adopted by another, and pressures which lead in this direction, through, for example, funding agencies. Specific issues such as the management of volunteers will also be considered. Prerequisite: SMO 201, 301 or 310.

Winter Term 2021
SMO 445 - Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Entrepreneurship

Corporate social and environmental responsibility is an important strategic consideration for companies around the world. The relationship a business has with both government and the larger public is integral to its success, reputation, and day-to-day activities. This course offers a practical introduction to social entrepreneurship and addresses entrepreneurship, innovation, and corporate social responsibility. The course focuses on key concepts in the field of social entrepreneurship and social enterprise, including organizational learning, sustainability, philanthropy, commercialization, and profit and nonprofit development. It also presents cases that illustrate these concepts in practical contexts. Ideas and skills learned in this course will better enable students to: play a role in shaping socially responsible businesses; develop a genuinely sustainable business enterprise; infuse non-profit organizations with a spirit of social innovation and practical financial sustainability; assist in influencing future government actions. Open to third and fourth year students.

Winter Term 2021
SMO 637 - Managing Not-For-Profit Organizations

Many management ideas and practices are derived from large, private, for-profit corporations. This course examines some of the issues confronting management in the not-for-profit sector, for example, health, education, charities, social/human services, and the arts. It addresses the issues of to what extent and how management in these types of organizations is different from the dominant private sector view of management, and how these practices are applied in the not for profit sector. Specific issues such as the management of volunteers, boards, and resource development programs are considered.

Winter Term 2021
SMO 645 - Social Entrepreneurship

Corporate social and environmental responsibility is an important strategic consideration for companies around the world. The relationship a business has with both government and the larger public is integral to its success, reputation, and day-to-day activities. This course offers a practical introduction to social entrepreneurship and addresses entrepreneurship, innovation, and corporate social responsibility. The course focuses on key concepts in the field of social entrepreneurship and social enterprise, including organizational learning, sustainability, philanthropy, commercialization, and profit and nonprofit development. It also presents cases that illustrate these concepts in practical contexts. Ideas and skills learned in this course will better enable students to; play a role in shaping socially responsible businesses; develop a genuinely sustainable business enterprise; infuse non-profit organizations with a spirit of social innovation and practical financial sustainability; assist in influencing future government actions.

Winter Term 2021
SMO 704 - Individual Research

Prerequisite: Registration in Business PhD Program or written permission of instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students.

Fall Term 2020

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