Willow White, PhD

Assistant Professor, Augustana - Fine Arts & Humanities

Pronouns: she, her

Contact

Assistant Professor, Augustana - Fine Arts & Humanities
Email
wdwhite@ualberta.ca
Address
3-26 Founders' Hall
4901-46 Ave
Camrose AB
T4V 2R3

Overview

Area of Study / Keywords

Literature and Drama Women Writers Long 18th Century Empire and Colonialism Indigenous Studies


About

My research focuses on English theatre and literature of the long eighteenth century with specialization in women writers, literatures of empire, and Indigeneity. I completed my PhD at McGill University in 2021 and have published and presented work on a variety of historical women writers. My essays have appeared in Women’s Writing and Eighteenth-Century Studies.

My current major project is a new edition of the memoir of eighteenth-century Seneca adoptee, Mary Jemison, for Broadview Press (co-edited with Tiffany Potter, UBC).

I am Scots-Cree Métis and a proud member of the Métis Nation of Alberta. I welcome emails and meetings with all Indigenous students at Augustana. You can learn more about resources for Indigenous students at Augustana's Indigenous Portal



Research

 Publications

Journal Articles

“Feminist Sensibilities: The Feud of Elizabeth Inchbald and Mary Wollstonecraft.” Eighteenth-Century Studies 55, no. 3 (2022): 299-315. DOI: 10.1353/ecs.2022.0019

“Comic Collusion: Frances Burney’s The Witlings and the Mentorship of Arthur Murphy.” Women’s Writing 28, no. 2 (2021): 368-383. DOI: 10.1080/09699082.2020.1847823

Book Chapters

“An Extra-Illustrated Edition of Hannah More’s Florio.” In Many Women, Many Voices: Stories from the McGill Collections, edited by Nathalie Cooke et al., 13-14. Montreal: ROAAr, 2018.

Edited Volumes

“A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison," edited by Tiffany Potter and Willow White. Broadview. Forthcoming fall 2022.

Book Reviews and Other

“Play-Texts in the Brady Collection: A Spotlight on 18th-Century Female Playwrights.” Christ  Church Library Newsletter 12, no. 2-3 (2021): 13-15. <https://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/library-and-archives/play-texts-brady-collection-ccln-vol-122-3-2020-2021>

Review of The Oxford Handbook of the Georgian Theatre, 1737-1832, edited by David Francis Taylor and Julia Swindells. Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film 47, no. 2 (2020): 209-212. <https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1748372720934205>

Entries on “Elizabeth Inchbald,” “The British Theatre by Elizabeth Inchbald,” “The Mogul Tale by Elizabeth Inchbald,” and “The Witlings by Frances Burney.” In The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Romantic-Era Women’s Writing. Ed. Natasha Duquette. London and New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Forthcoming 2022.

"Teaching Guide for Instructors: A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison." Broadview: Forthcoming fall 2022.


Teaching

Courses offered

  • AUENG 102: Critical Reading, Critical Writing
  • AUIND 101/201: Introduction to Indigenous Studies
  • AUIND 399: Theories in Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Feminisms


Courses

AUENG 102 - Critical Reading, Critical Writing

English 102 has two objectives. The first is to train students in the practices of analytical reading and critical thinking. To that end, we will read engaging literary texts in several genres. The second objective is to help students develop effective communication skills, particularly their writing abilities. To develop writing techniques, we will workshop grammatical skills which will provide the necessary building blocks for university-level writing. Prerequisite: ELA 30-1 or AUENG 101.


AUIND 101 - Introduction to Indigenous Studies

An introduction to the discipline of Indigenous Studies covering indigenous methodologies and theory through the lens of contemporary issues affecting Aboriginal peoples in Canada and attempts to rectify these issues. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUIND 101 and AUIND 201.


AUIND 201 - Introduction to Indigenous Studies

An introduction to the discipline of Indigenous Studies covering indigenous methodologies and theory through the lens of contemporary issues affecting Aboriginal peoples in Canada and attempts to rectify these issues. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUIND 101 and AUIND 201.


AUIND 399 - Theories in Indigenous Studies

A senior level course dealing with the theoretical basis of indigenous studies with a focus on major theories and theoreticians found and/or used in indigenous studies, postcolonial studies and subaltern studies. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUIND 399 and 499. Prerequisites: One of AUIND 101, 201.


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