ONCOL - Oncology

Offered By:
Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry

Below are the courses available from the ONCOL code. Select a course to view the available classes, additional class notes, and class times.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-1)

Introduction into fundamental medical physics concepts including theory of atomic and nuclear structure, radioactivity, and electromagnetic and particulate radiation. Topics to be covered include production of medically useful radiation, interaction of radiation with matter, radiation dose, and an introduction to physics concepts used in a radiation oncology environment.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-1)

Emphasis will be placed on the production of radiation, and its shaping and measurements in the clinical environment, by exploring the fundamental concepts in equipment used in radiation therapy. Specific topics include: principles of the external beam equipment (e.g. orthovoltage unit, linear accelerator), brachytherapy, diagnostic imaging systems (e.g. X-ray imaging, CT, MRI, PET), image guidance equipment, treatment simulators, and general QA procedures.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-1)

Introduction of the fundamental concepts in radiation protection and safety for the patient, self, and general public associated with radiotherapy and imaging practices. Topics include: general principles and practices of working safely with ionizing radiation and imaging systems in a healthcare environment, basic radiation shielding considerations and facility design, monitoring and measurement of radiation for protection purposes, and relevant regulatory agencies and associated standards.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

An introduction to the biology of cancer highlighting features that distinguish normal cells from cancer cells. Specific topics include the genetic basis of cancer, control of cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis, mechanism of action of cancer drugs and the development of resistance.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

A survey course outlining the basic concepts in oncology including basic medical terminology, cancer screening, diagnosis, cancer staging and pathology, pharmacology, and modalities for treating primary and metastatic cancers.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SPR/SUM, 30HR/W 4W)

A comprehensive course that covers the principles of diagnostics, therapeutics and end of life care for patients with malignant hematological illnesses as well as solid tumors. Psychosocial and spiritual issues associated with cancer patients and their family will be explored.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-2)

A unique application-based course exploring the use of imaging in radiation therapy. Using a variety of imaging modalities, students will develop skills in identifying pathological conditions, contouring target volumes, and performing treatment field localization. Students will analyze and interpret images to make informed radiation therapy treatment decisions.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-1)

The field of clinical oncology is introduced. The focus is on the evaluation and treatment of tumours in a site-specific manner. Students learn various treatment modalities, regimens, and techniques utilized for the most common tumour sites.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-1)

The field of clinical oncology is further explored. The focus is on the evaluation and treatment of tumours in a site-specific manner. Students continue to learn various treatment modalities, regimens, and techniques utilized for the most common tumour sites.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Provides an introduction to oncology with an emphasis on the molecular and cellular biology of cancer. Specific topics include the genetic basis of cancer, the control of cell proliferation, metastasis, tumour immunology, angiogenesis, and cancer therapies. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 or CELL 201 with a minimum grade of C, or consent of the Department.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

An introduction to the physics, chemistry, and biology of radiation effects on cells and tissues. Concepts discussed include the biological factors that influence the response of normal and neoplastic cells to radiation therapy; cell survival curves; linear energy transfer and relative biological effectiveness; effects on tissues of time, dose and fractionation of radiation treatment; and emerging concepts in radiobiology.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-2)

The foundation of radiation therapy treatment planning considering radiation dose deposition within the patient. Characteristics of radiation beams, and the intricacies of treatment calculations are applied in order to develop an appropriate treatment strategy for typical tumor locations. The course covers the use of low and high energy X-ray, electron and Cobalt60 for a variety of treatment techniques.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-2)

Use of computerized treatment planning systems to create radiation treatment plans for the oncology patient. Topics include: 3-D conformal, 4-D planning, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), protons, electrons, and brachytherapy. Trends and advances impacting medical dosimetry practice will be covered.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

A lecture and reading course to address nutritional issues specifically related to cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment and recovery. Graduate students may not register for credit (see ONCOL 524). Credit will only be given for one of ONCOL 524, 424 and AFNS 524, 424. Prerequisite: (NUTR 301 and 302) or (NU FS 352 and 6* Biochemistry) or ONCOL 320.

★ 3 (fi VAR)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

This course provides an in-depth analysis of selected topics in cancer research. The course features three modules, each covering a different area of cancer research. Modules 1 - 3 and Modules 4 - 6 will be offered in alternate years. Each module is comprised of 8 sessions of 80 min each, with each module taught as an independent unit. Modules have both lecture and group discussion components. Students can take both offerings (modules 1 through 3 and modules 4 through 6) up to a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: CELL 201/BIOL 201 and a 300 level science course in BIOCH, GENET, ONCOL, CELL or consent of the Department.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITH/SP/SU, 0-0-3)

Practical techniques in the use of radioisotopes in the life sciences. This course focuses on safe handling of radio-isotopes, measurement of radioactivity, performance of radiochemical reactions and the application of radionuclides in life sciences (99mTc-labeling and 18F-labeling). The accompanying seminar provides the necessary background knowledge to engage with the practical challenges of radionuclide handling. Credit cannot be obtained for both ONCOL 475 and 575.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

The general objective of the course is to explore specific clinical and research issues in psychosocial oncology through guided independent study and presentation. The course is primarily designed to fit into masters and doctoral programs in a range of disciplines including psychology, educational psychology, social work, family studies, nursing, and pastoral care. It is also open to students in other disciplines who are considering a career in oncology. Issues in psychosocial oncology such as the mind-body connection, coping strategies, cancer and its impact on the family, grief and loss issues, survivorship issues and many other related topics will be explored. Course assignments will allow students from different disciplines to investigate their own areas of particular interest. Prerequisite: consent of Department.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

The course will provide an introduction to the basic science of oncology. Topics to be covered comprise: the genetic basis of cancer, including the role of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes; mechanisms of carcinogenesis and radiation-sensitivity, including DNA repair and cell cycle control; the molecular basis of tumor metastasis, including tumor cell invasion, extravasation and dormancy; the role of inflammation in cancer initiation and progression; angiogenesis; cancer genetics, and epigenetics; cell signaling; experimental therapeutics; cancer stem cells; drug-resistance; metabolism and palliation. Course offered in alternate (even-numbered) years. Prerequisites: BIOCH 200, and one of the following: BIOCH 320 or 330 or ONCOL 320.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

A lecture and reading course to address nutritional issues specifically related to cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment and recovery. Lectures are the same as for ONCOL 424, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of ONCOL 524, 424 and AFNS 524, 424. Prerequisite: (NUTR 301 and 302) or (NUFS 352 and 6* Biochemistry) or ONCOL 320.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Fundamentals of radiation physics, production and properties of ionizing radiation and their interactions with matter and tissue. Interactions of photons and of charged particles with matter. Concepts of radiation dosimetry (theoretical and experimental, cavity theory and ionization chambers). Consent of Department required.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Theory and practical techniques of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Topics include single and multiple external beams, scatter analysis, inhomogeneity corrections, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), dose calculation algorithms, fundamentals of brachytherapy, and brachytherapy dosimetry systems. Prerequisite: ONCOL 550.

★ 2 (fi 4)(SPR/SUM, 0-0-4)

Practical aspects of medical physics as applied to radiation therapy. Exposure to the operation of various therapy machines and dose measuring equipment. Application of techniques to measure physical parameters of radiation beams. Introduction to radiation treatment planning with techniques for specific tumor sites. Prerequisite: ONCOL 550. Corequisite: ONCOL 552.

★ 2 (fi 4)(SPR/SUM, 0-0-4)

Practical experience with medical physics applied to diagnostic imaging. Operation of radiographic imaging systems and their evaluation with various test equipment and dosimetry systems. Introduction to the operation and evaluation of some advanced imaging modalities. Prerequisites: ONCOL 550 and 562. Corequisites: ONCOL 568 and 564.

★ 2 (fi 4)(FIRST, 2-0-0)

Sources of radiation, basic dosimetry, and hazards of ionizing radiation. Basics of radiation safety. Techniques for the detection, use, and safe handling of radiation sources. Radiation safety codes, laws and regulations. Consent of Department required.

★ 2 (fi 4)(FIRST, 2-0-0)

Explore the use of technology and physics principles in the diagnosis, tumour and normal tissue delineation, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and treatment verification as applied to cancer patients. Consent of Department required.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

A system theory approach to the production, analysis, processing and reconstruction of medical images. An extensive use of Fourier techniques is used to describe the processes involved with conventional radiographic detectors, digital and computed radiography. Review and application of image processing techniques used in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. Consent of Department required.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Discussion of the fundamental physics of radioactivity, the use of unsealed sources in medical diagnosis and treatment. Unsealed source dosimetry, nuclear measurement instrumentation, spectrometry. Design and function of gamma cameras, single photon emission tomography, and positron emission tomography. Prerequisites: ONCOL 550 and 562.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Current theories and models of cellular responses to ionizing radiation. Modification of radiation response. Radiobiology of normal and neoplastic tissue systems. Late effects of radiation on normal tissue. Radiobiological modeling of normal tissue complication, probability and tumor control probability.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Rigorous development of the physics of x-ray production, interaction and detection in diagnostic radiology, including mammography and ultrasound. In-depth analysis of analog and digital systems in radiography and fluoroscopy is given. The description and design of computed tomographic systems as well as the associated reconstruction algorithms from single to multislice helical systems are studied. Prerequisites: ONCOL 550, 562.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

Reading and discussion of current research literature on selected topics in experimental oncology under the direction of one or more faculty members. Topics presently available include cell adhesion mechanisms, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair, radiotherapy and susceptibility and resistance, oncogenes/tumor suppressor genes, and tumor cell metastasis. Notes: (1) Grades will be based on participation in group discussions and/or written reports from assigned readings with emphasis on critical evaluation of the subject matter. (2) Students in other graduate programs may register with the consent of Instructors. Prerequisite: consent of Department.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITH/SP/SU, 0-0-3)

Practical techniques in the use of radioisotopes in the life sciences. This course focuses on safe handling of radio-isotopes, measurement of radioactivity, performance of radiochemical reactions and the application of radionuclides in life sciences (99mTc-labeling and 18F-labeling). The accompanying seminar provides the necessary background knowledge to engage with the practical challenges of radionuclide handling. Credit cannot be obtained for both ONCOL 475 and 575. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course will provide an overview of molecular imaging probes and their application in basic and clinical science. The course will have an emphasis on radionuclide based probes and on their application in oncology but will also introduce other classes of probes (optical, MR, x-ray contrast, ultrasound and photoacoustic) and other pathologies. The course will examine imaging techniques, cell and tissue targets for imaging probes, the chemical elaboration of molecular imaging probes and some applications in the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. Molecular imaging in drug development will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department.

★ 1 (fi 4)(TWO TERM, 0-1S-0)

Weekly seminars given by faculty on topics of interest to the medical physics community that are not formally included with the other didactic courses. Includes medical statistics, anatomy/physiology for medical physics, site-specific cancer, experience in clinic, Monte Carlo simulation, Matlab, MR spectroscopy, finite element analysis, and image fusion. No prerequisite.

★ 1 (fi 4)(TWO TERM, 0-1S-0)

Weekly seminars given by faculty on topics of interest to the medical physics community that are not formally included with the other didactic courses. Includes medical statistics, anatomy/physiology for medical physics, site-specific cancer, experience in clinic, Monte Carlo simulation, Matlab, MR spectroscopy, finite element analysis, and image fusion. No prerequisite.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 0-3S-0)

A directed reading and seminar course based on recent developments in the cellular and molecular biology of cancer. The students will critically review papers selected from the recent literature and give oral presentations. Prerequisites: ONCOL 520 and consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

★ 2 (fi 4)(SECOND, 0-1.5S-0)

A general seminar/discussion course on recent advances in a wide range of topics related to cancer development and management. Selected topics include experimental therapeutics, molecular oncogenetics, tumour immunobiology, DNA repair, and cell cycle regulation. Notes: (1) all graduate students in the Department of Oncology are expected to attend the seminars whether or not they are registered in the course. (2) All graduate students in the Department of Oncology should register in the course in their second year and present a seminar based on their research project. (3) All graduate students registered in ONCOL 660 will write a paper on a selected topic. Restricted to graduate students in the Department of Oncology.

★ 1 (fi 2)(FIRST, 0-1S-0)

A general seminar course based on recent advances in a wide range of topics related to cancer. Note: Oncology 661 should be taken in the first term of the year in which Oncology 660 is taken. Graduate students must obtain one credit from ONCOL 661 in order to meet the minimum requirements for the MSc and PhD programs in the Department of Oncology. Restricted to graduate students in the Department of Oncology.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Advanced course on modern magnetic resonance techniques including in-depth description of hardware; advanced imaging sequences and image reconstruction methods; methodologies for in-vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prerequisite: BME 564 and consent of Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Guided lecture course with preparation and delivery of teaching lectures on a current topic of Magnetic Resonance research in conjunction with ONCOL 692 and 693 presentations. Prerequisite: ONCOL 690 and consent of Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Guided reading course in advanced ultrasound, fluoroscopy, X-ray CT, or nuclear imaging with preparation and presentation of teaching lectures in conjunction with ONCOL 691 and 693 presentations. Prerequisite: ONCOL 562, 564, 568, 600, and consent of Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Guided reading course with preparation and delivery of teaching lectures in novel radiotherapeutic techniques, advanced radiation techniques and delivery in conjunction with ONCOL 691 and 692 presentations. Prerequisite: ONCOL 550, 552, 600, and consent of Instructor.