KRLS - Kinesiology, Recreation, Leisure and Sport

Offered By:
Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation

Below are the courses available from the KRLS code. Select a course to view the available classes, additional class notes, and class times.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 2-1S-0)

This course brings a sociological imagination to the study of sport and leisure with particular reference to Canadian society. Note: Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 104 or PERLS 104.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-1)

Provides students with an introduction to the management concepts required to successfully administer a sport, recreation or physical activity. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 105 or PERLS 105.

Starting: 2023-09-01 KRLS 105 - Introduction to the Management of Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation Programs

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Provides students with an introduction to the management concepts required to successfully administer a sport, recreation or physical activity. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 105 or PERLS 105.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

An introductory examination of Canadian leisure, sport, physical cultures, recreation, tourism, and health, in a global world, since the 19th century. Topics are integrated to understand the past in order to think broadly and critically through historical study of culture and society. Prerequisite: KRLS 104. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 204 or PERLS 204.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

An introduction to research, theory and practice pertaining to participation in physical activity and leisure by persons with impairments. The course explores the intersection of social influences and personal interests on participation in active lifestyles. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 207 or PERLS 207.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

In this course, students will explore the breadth of career paths and scope of practice that can be pursued with their degrees. Strategies for conducting job searches, application and resume writing skills, interviewing and networking skills, and engaging stakeholders will also be addressed. Throughout the course, students will be tasked with creating a professional portfolio to be built upon and utilized as they progress through their remaining program, in field learning courses, and as they enter into their careers. Through multiple micro career explorations and informational interviewing with established practicing professionals students will be connected with throughout the course (e.g., alumni, practitioners in professions of interest), students will discover and uncover how professionals use degree knowledge to build careers. Through these micro career experiences (variable; ~1 -4 hrs/ week or ~15 -60 hrs/term), students will be guided in learning how to identify and articulate transferable skills from all of their own experiences, including from their academic program, that can then be utilized in their future career journey. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the micro career explorations and in field learning experiences with working professionals students will engage with throughout the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 45 course units.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

In this course, students will explore the breadth of career paths and scope of practice that can be pursued with their degrees. Strategies for conducting job searches, application and resume writing skills, interviewing and networking skills, and engaging stakeholders will also be addressed. Throughout the course, students will be tasked with creating a professional portfolio to be built upon and utilized as they progress through their remaining program, in field learning courses, and as they enter into their careers. Through multiple micro career explorations and informational interviewing with established practicing professionals students will be connected with throughout the course (e.g., alumni, practitioners in professions of interest), students will discover and uncover how professionals use degree knowledge to build careers. Through these micro career experiences (variable; ~1 -4 hrs/ week or ~15 -60 hrs/term), students will be guided in learning how to identify and articulate transferable skills from all of their own experiences, including from their academic program, that can then be utilized in their future career journey. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the micro career explorations and in field learning experiences with working professionals students will engage with throughout the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 45 course units.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

In this course, students will explore the breadth of career paths and scope of practice that can be pursued with their degrees. Strategies for conducting job searches, application and resume writing skills, interviewing and networking skills, and engaging stakeholders will also be addressed. Throughout the course, students will be tasked with creating a professional portfolio to be built upon and utilized as they progress through their remaining program, in field learning courses, and as they enter into their careers. Through multiple micro career explorations and informational interviewing with established practicing professionals students will be connected with throughout the course (e.g., alumni, practitioners in professions of interest), students will discover and uncover how professionals use degree knowledge to build careers. Through these micro career experiences (variable; ~1 -4 hrs/ week or ~15 -60 hrs/term), students will be guided in learning how to identify and articulate transferable skills from all of their own experiences, including from their academic program, that can then be utilized in their future career journey. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the micro career explorations and in field learning experiences with working professionals students will engage with throughout the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 45 course units.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

This course provides students the opportunity to develop knowledge and competencies in interpersonal theory specific to Kinesiology, Sport, and/or Recreation settings. Content covered in this course include such topics as effective verbal, non-verbal, and written communication strategies, active listening with patients/clients, reflective practice, managing conflict and difficult conversations, negotiations in the workplace, decision making, leadership, respect for diversity, intercultural competence, self-awareness, collaboration, teamwork and interdisciplinary practice, and generating and synthesizing evidence, and applying ethical principles. This course draws upon previous coursework and integrates theory and practice across course learning activities to apply the course content to the breadth of populations, settings, and career pathways within the field of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation. As a part of the course, students will participate in multiple micro field placements (variable; ~1 - 4 hrs/ week or ~15 -60 hrs/term) with assigned mentors, observing and engaging in interpersonal relations and participating in the planning and implementation of programs as is appropriate. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the micro in field learning experiences. Prerequisite: Successful completion of KRLS 290.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

This course provides students the opportunity to develop knowledge and competencies in interpersonal theory specific to Kinesiology, Sport, and/or Recreation settings. Content covered in this course include such topics as effective verbal, non-verbal, and written communication strategies, active listening with patients/clients, reflective practice, managing conflict and difficult conversations, negotiations in the workplace, decision making, leadership, respect for diversity, intercultural competence, self-awareness, collaboration, teamwork and interdisciplinary practice, and generating and synthesizing evidence, and applying ethical principles. This course draws upon previous coursework and integrates theory and practice across course learning activities to apply the course content to the breadth of populations, settings, and career pathways within the field of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation. As a part of the course, students will participate in multiple micro field placements (variable; ~1 - 4 hrs/ week or ~15 -60 hrs/term) with assigned mentors, observing and engaging in interpersonal relations and participating in the planning and implementation of programs as is appropriate. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the micro in field learning experiences. Prerequisite: Successful completion of KRLS 290.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

This course provides students the opportunity to develop knowledge and competencies in interpersonal theory specific to Kinesiology, Sport, and/or Recreation settings. Content covered in this course include such topics as effective verbal, non-verbal, and written communication strategies, active listening with patients/clients, reflective practice, managing conflict and difficult conversations, negotiations in the workplace, decision making, leadership, respect for diversity, intercultural competence, self-awareness, collaboration, teamwork and interdisciplinary practice, and generating and synthesizing evidence, and applying ethical principles. This course draws upon previous coursework and integrates theory and practice across course learning activities to apply the course content to the breadth of populations, settings, and career pathways within the field of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation. As a part of the course, students will participate in multiple micro field placements (variable; ~1 - 4 hrs/ week or ~15 -60 hrs/term) with assigned mentors, observing and engaging in interpersonal relations and participating in the planning and implementation of programs as is appropriate. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the micro in field learning experiences. Prerequisite: Successful completion of KRLS 290.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 2-1S-0)

Building on introductory sociological concepts from KRLS 104 and historical foundations from KRLS 204, the course focuses on developing a critical understanding of the power relations operating through contemporary social and cultural processes that shape the body, sport and leisure, such as colonialism, consumer culture, globalization and neo-liberalism. Prerequisites: KRLS 104 and 204. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 304 or PERLS 304.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course examines financial issues associated with the recreation, sport and tourism industries. Topics include industry trends and challenges, public partnerships, economic rationales for investment, sources of funding, revenues, and business development. Prerequisite KRLS 105. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 305 or PERLS 305.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course explores perspectives on practices related to the health and wellness of Indigenous Peoples in Canada. In this context health is defined as a state of balance involving body, emotions, mind, and spirit. The various forms of activity, sport, recreation, and leisure activities in which Indigenous Peoples participate will be examined. Prerequisite: KRLS 104 or NS 111. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 323 or PERLS 323.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

An examination of the specific role played by volunteer management in the delivery of recreation, sport and physical activity programs, including the structure and processes of the voluntary organizations that make up the recreation delivery system. Prerequisite: KRLS 105. Note: Credit will be granted for only one of RLS 335 or KRLS 335. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 335 or PERLS 335.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Theoretical consideration for the organization and administration of exercise, sport, recreation, and leisure programs. Prerequisite: KRLS 105. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 350 or PERLS 350.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3L-0)

An examination of the planning, management and operations of sport, leisure and recreation areas and facilities (inclusive of sport, recreation, and tourism). Note: Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Prerequisite: KRLS 105. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 352 or PERLS 352 or 452.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-1)

An overview of basic qualitative and quantitative assessment principles and their use to deliver quality physical activity and recreation services for individuals with diverse needs. Prerequisites: KRLS 207 and KIN 109 or RLS 210 or STAT 141 or 151. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 370 or PERLS 370.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-1)

Provides an overview of basic assessment and evaluation principles and their application in the provision of physical activity for children and youth. Designed for individuals who are particularly interested in assessment of movement; this course will encourage critical thought about assessment and evaluation of the movement of children and youth. For the purpose of instruction and evaluation in instructional/coaching/leadership settings. Prerequisites: KIN 207 or 307 and KRLS 207, and successful completion of 30 course credits. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 371 or PERLS 371.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

In this project, micro field placement (variable; ~1 -4 hrs/ week or ~15 -60 hrs/term) based course, students will work in small interdisciplinary teams to analyze a complex problem and propose a solution (strategies and interventions) to address a real -world issue and context. Students will apply theoretical knowledge to attempt to solve practical challenges they identify, demonstrate their understanding of the challenge and potential solutions through presentation of their ideas, and design an implementation and evaluation strategy. Students will be asked to draw connections between their theoretical course learnings and the practical application of skills through discussion of proposed solutions with team members and other course participants. With the support of the Course Instructor, Practicum Advisor, and Industry Partners, students will visualize, identify, and articulate how the practical application of their knowledge altered their self-efficacy in the competency areas required of the experience. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to micro in field learning experiences scheduled for each iteration of the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of KRLS 291.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

In this project, micro field placement (variable; ~1 -4 hrs/ week or ~15 -60 hrs/term) based course, students will work in small interdisciplinary teams to analyze a complex problem and propose a solution (strategies and interventions) to address a real -world issue and context. Students will apply theoretical knowledge to attempt to solve practical challenges they identify, demonstrate their understanding of the challenge and potential solutions through presentation of their ideas, and design an implementation and evaluation strategy. Students will be asked to draw connections between their theoretical course learnings and the practical application of skills through discussion of proposed solutions with team members and other course participants. With the support of the Course Instructor, Practicum Advisor, and Industry Partners, students will visualize, identify, and articulate how the practical application of their knowledge altered their self-efficacy in the competency areas required of the experience. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to micro in field learning experiences scheduled for each iteration of the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of KRLS 291.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

In this project, micro field placement (variable; ~1 -4 hrs/ week or ~15 -60 hrs/term) based course, students will work in small interdisciplinary teams to analyze a complex problem and propose a solution (strategies and interventions) to address a real -world issue and context. Students will apply theoretical knowledge to attempt to solve practical challenges they identify, demonstrate their understanding of the challenge and potential solutions through presentation of their ideas, and design an implementation and evaluation strategy. Students will be asked to draw connections between their theoretical course learnings and the practical application of skills through discussion of proposed solutions with team members and other course participants. With the support of the Course Instructor, Practicum Advisor, and Industry Partners, students will visualize, identify, and articulate how the practical application of their knowledge altered their self-efficacy in the competency areas required of the experience. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to micro in field learning experiences scheduled for each iteration of the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of KRLS 291.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course explores strategic, economic, and cultural issues related to the business of hockey - with a specific focus on the National Hockey League. Students will develop a critical understanding of the hockey industry and its stakeholders. Prerequisite: Students should be in the third or fourth year of their degree program. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 411 or PERLS 411.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the concept of play. It will offer learning experiences that will enable students to create play in various recreation, sport, tourism and physical activity contexts. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 420 or PERLS 420.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

The content will include the defining criteria and values of Play Leadership. The roles and responsibilities of Play Leaders in fostering learning and development through play will be examined. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 421 or PERLS 421.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SPR/SUM, VARIABLE)

The Play Around the World project provides a 3-month international or Canadian based, cross-cultural field placement working with children and youth of all abilities in the area of play, recreation and sport. Students apply and are selected in Fall Term, and then have a significant time commitment during the Winter Term to prepare for their Intersession field placement. Travel takes place May through August. This course represents the theoretical aspect of the experience, and involves written and creative work in the area of programming in cross-cultural settings. Prerequisite: KRLS 421 is strongly recommended. Corequisite: KRLS 441. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 440 or PERLS 440.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(SPR/SUM, VARIABLE)

The Play Around the World project provides a 3-month international or Canadian based, cross-cultural field placement working with children and youth of all abilities in the area of play, recreation and sport. Students apply and are selected in Fall Term, and then have a significant time commitment during the Winter Term to prepare for their Intersession field placement. Travel takes place May through August. This course represents the theoretical aspect of the experience, and involves written and creative work in the area of programming in cross-cultural settings. Prerequisite: KRLS 421 is strongly recommended. Corequisite: KRLS 441. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 440 or PERLS 440.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(SPR/SUM, VARIABLE)

The Play Around the World project provides a 3-month international or Canadian based, cross-cultural field placement working with children and youth of all abilities in the area of play, recreation and sport. Students apply and are selected in Fall Term, and then have a significant time commitment during the Winter Term to prepare for their Intersession field placement. Travel takes place May through August. This course represents the theoretical aspect of the experience, and involves written and creative work in the area of programming in cross-cultural settings. Prerequisite: KRLS 421 is strongly recommended. Corequisite: KRLS 441. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 440 or PERLS 440.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SPR/SUM, VARIABLE)

The Play Around the World project provides a 3-month international or Canadian based, cross-cultural field placement working with children and youth of all abilities in the area of play, recreation and sport. Students apply and are selected in Fall Term, and then have a significant time commitment during the Winter Term to prepare for their Intersession field placement. Travel takes place May through August. This course represents the experiential part of the project. Prerequisite: KRLS 421 is strongly recommended. Corequisite: KRLS 440. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 441 or PERLS 441.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(SPR/SUM, VARIABLE)

The Play Around the World project provides a 3-month international or Canadian based, cross-cultural field placement working with children and youth of all abilities in the area of play, recreation and sport. Students apply and are selected in Fall Term, and then have a significant time commitment during the Winter Term to prepare for their Intersession field placement. Travel takes place May through August. This course represents the experiential part of the project. Prerequisite: KRLS 421 is strongly recommended. Corequisite: KRLS 440. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 441 or PERLS 441.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(SPR/SUM, VARIABLE)

The Play Around the World project provides a 3-month international or Canadian based, cross-cultural field placement working with children and youth of all abilities in the area of play, recreation and sport. Students apply and are selected in Fall Term, and then have a significant time commitment during the Winter Term to prepare for their Intersession field placement. Travel takes place May through August. This course represents the experiential part of the project. Prerequisite: KRLS 421 is strongly recommended. Corequisite: KRLS 440. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 441 or PERLS 441.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

An advanced seminar course that critically and collaboratively examines select sport and leisure practices through popular and contemporary examples, using a cultural studies framework. Prerequisite: KRLS 304, or consent of the instructor. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 451 or PERLS 351.

★ 6 (fi 12)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Students will participate in a singular, comprehensive, high -density, macro learning (variable; ~8 -12 hrs/week or ~120 -180 hrs/term), In Field Learning placement with an assigned mentor. During this intensive in the field learning experience, students will become fully integrated into the work at their assigned Field Placement that will provide students with an intensive short term hands-on practical experience in a setting relevant to their subject of study and lead to relatively independent work by the completion of the placement. Students will work towards contributing to their assigned field placement's capacity, critically assessing issues, designing, implementing, and evaluating strategic initiatives, and/or engaging actively in research while at the same time gaining confidence and skills as a practicing professional under the direction of the course instructor and the placement mentor. Students will report back to the course instructor regularly i) proposed ideas and plans for work appropriate to the working environment that aligns with the settings mission, values, and workflow; ii) information collected and resources utilized that were needed to assess and complete work functions; iii) evaluation of what skill sets are required to complete work functions, and iv) judgements on whether their current skill set meets the identified work functions. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the macro in field learning experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of KRLS 290 or KRLS 291.

★ 3 (fi 12)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Students will participate in a singular, comprehensive, high -density, macro learning (variable; ~8 -12 hrs/week or ~120 -180 hrs/term), In Field Learning placement with an assigned mentor. During this intensive in the field learning experience, students will become fully integrated into the work at their assigned Field Placement that will provide students with an intensive short term hands-on practical experience in a setting relevant to their subject of study and lead to relatively independent work by the completion of the placement. Students will work towards contributing to their assigned field placement's capacity, critically assessing issues, designing, implementing, and evaluating strategic initiatives, and/or engaging actively in research while at the same time gaining confidence and skills as a practicing professional under the direction of the course instructor and the placement mentor. Students will report back to the course instructor regularly i) proposed ideas and plans for work appropriate to the working environment that aligns with the settings mission, values, and workflow; ii) information collected and resources utilized that were needed to assess and complete work functions; iii) evaluation of what skill sets are required to complete work functions, and iv) judgements on whether their current skill set meets the identified work functions. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the macro in field learning experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of KRLS 290 or KRLS 291.

★ 3 (fi 12)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Students will participate in a singular, comprehensive, high -density, macro learning (variable; ~8 -12 hrs/week or ~120 -180 hrs/term), In Field Learning placement with an assigned mentor. During this intensive in the field learning experience, students will become fully integrated into the work at their assigned Field Placement that will provide students with an intensive short term hands-on practical experience in a setting relevant to their subject of study and lead to relatively independent work by the completion of the placement. Students will work towards contributing to their assigned field placement's capacity, critically assessing issues, designing, implementing, and evaluating strategic initiatives, and/or engaging actively in research while at the same time gaining confidence and skills as a practicing professional under the direction of the course instructor and the placement mentor. Students will report back to the course instructor regularly i) proposed ideas and plans for work appropriate to the working environment that aligns with the settings mission, values, and workflow; ii) information collected and resources utilized that were needed to assess and complete work functions; iii) evaluation of what skill sets are required to complete work functions, and iv) judgements on whether their current skill set meets the identified work functions. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the macro in field learning experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of KRLS 290 or KRLS 291.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-0-3)

This is an independent study course that allows students to explore a research topic under the supervision of a Doctoral student. Students will use the resources of libraries, laboratories, and current research projects with the goal of gaining an understanding of the process of conducting research. The student will be introduced to methodology and theory in a designated research area through reading, discussion, and practical application. Normally for students in their fourth year of study. Note: Students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 over their last 30 credits. Prerequisite: KIN 209 or 409 or RLS 210 and consent of the Associate Dean, (Undergraduate Programs). Students must arrange a topic with a Doctoral student. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 495 or PERLS 495.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

A course offered on a topic of current interest in physical education and sport. Topics may vary from year to year. Prerequisite: Consent of Faculty. Credit will be granted for only one of KRLS 497 or PERLS 497.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

A course designed to meet the needs of individual students in completion of the In Field Learning requirements of their degree program. A singular, comprehensive, high-density, micro experience (variable; ~1-4 hrs/ week or ~15-60 hrs/term), in combination with academically focused work, completed under the supervision, mentorship, and direction of an academic member in the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation or approved affiliate. Normally for students in their fourth year of study. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the micro in field learning experience. Prerequisite: KRLS 290 or KRLS 291 and consent of the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Programs). Students must arrange a project with an academic staff member or approved affiliate.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

A course designed to meet the needs of individual students in completion of the In Field Learning requirements of their degree program. A singular, comprehensive, high-density, micro experience (variable; ~1-4 hrs/ week or ~15-60 hrs/term), in combination with academically focused work, completed under the supervision, mentorship, and direction of an academic member in the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation or approved affiliate. Normally for students in their fourth year of study. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the micro in field learning experience. Prerequisite: KRLS 290 or KRLS 291 and consent of the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Programs). Students must arrange a project with an academic staff member or approved affiliate.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

A course designed to meet the needs of individual students in completion of the In Field Learning requirements of their degree program. A singular, comprehensive, high-density, micro experience (variable; ~1-4 hrs/ week or ~15-60 hrs/term), in combination with academically focused work, completed under the supervision, mentorship, and direction of an academic member in the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation or approved affiliate. Normally for students in their fourth year of study. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are variable per week in addition to the micro in field learning experience. Prerequisite: KRLS 290 or KRLS 291 and consent of the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Programs). Students must arrange a project with an academic staff member or approved affiliate.