REN R - Renewable Resources

Offered By:
Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences

Below are the courses available from the REN R code. Select a course to view the available classes, additional class notes, and class times.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

An introduction to forest trees, plants, insects, fungi, fire, biodiversity and ecology. Discusses the use of forests for wood products recreation, watersheds, wildlife, carbon, and overall management and policies in Alberta and elsewhere.

★ 0.1 (fi 3)(FIRST, 0-1S-3)

A general overview of the practice of Forestry. This orientation includes an introduction to basic forest measurements, forest management practices, and will include tours of a number of major forest operations in Alberta. Course runs for six days just prior to Fall registration and includes a seminar where students can connect with forestry professors and professionals. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

This course introduces students to environmental sciences by exploring the relationship between humans and their environment; especially the issues and science on the biosphere, atmosphere, and its species. Emphasis is on understanding our natural environment, our human impacts, and approaches to sustaining, managing, and restoring our natural resources using real-world issues such as climate change and biodiversity conservation.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-2)

Designed to introduce students to the principles and practices of measuring various natural resources and to the visualization, interpretation, and management of data.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-4)

Introduction to the classification, identification, distribution, habitat, and ecology of common trees, shrubs and herbaceous species typically found in Alberta and beyond. Lecture and labs emphasize the recognition of identifying characteristics and the use of dichotomous keys to identify about 250 plant species including higher taxa. A self-directed plant collection is mandatory and registered students are encouraged to contact the instructor during the summer months for instructions. Field exercises may take place off campus. This course requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Forests are key to sustaining biodiversity and critical services for society. This course examines interrelationships among forest ecosystem components including climate, soils, trees, plants, insects, wildlife, water, and people. Exploration of the scientific basis, and contemporary challenges in the protection and sustainable management of forests ecosystems. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 100. Not open to students in the BSc in Forestry or BSc in Forest Business Management programs.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Methods and applications of geographic information systems (GIS), including global positioning systems (GPS), photogrammetry, air photo interpretation and LIDAR, as they relate to natural resource management.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Introduction to animals in the context of conservation, interactions with people, and roles in natural ecosystems. Labs provide a survey of Western Canadian animal life, both vertebrate and invertebrate, with emphasis on recognition of higher taxa and on hierarchical classification. Field trip. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Elementary aspects of soil formation, occurrence in natural landscapes, and classification, including basic morphological, physical, and chemical characteristics employed in the identification of soils. Introduction to soil mineralogy, water movement, reactivity, organic matter, and nutrient cycling for predicting soil performance in both managed and natural landscapes. Prerequisite: *30. CHEM 101 and (BIOL 208 or EAS 201) recommended.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 210 - Introduction to Soil Science

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Elementary aspects of soil formation, occurrence in natural landscapes, and classification, including basic morphological, physical, and chemical characteristics employed in the identification of soils. Introduction to soil mineralogy, water movement, reactivity, organic matter, and nutrient cycling for predicting soil performance in both managed and natural landscapes. Prerequisite: 30 units. CHEM 101 and (BIOL 208 or EAS 201) recommended.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 1.5-0-1.5)

Introduces concepts of data science for analysis of problems related to the science and management of renewable resources. The course will use the R programming languages and R packages for manipulating, visualizing and analysing data, and for communicating results of analyses through graphics and literate programming. The use of R for statistics and analysis of spatial data will be introduced.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Principles and practices of measuring and estimating present and future fibre production of forest communities, including applications of statistics, sampling techniques, regression analysis, and computer programming. Prerequisites: *3 STAT. Pre- or corequisite: REN R 110. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 215 - Forest Measurements

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Principles and practices of measuring and estimating present and future fibre production of forest communities, including applications of statistics, sampling techniques, regression analysis, and computer programming. Prerequisites: 3 units in STAT. Pre- or corequisite: REN R 110. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

The course introduces basic hydrological principles, the global water cycle, global demand and supply of freshwater, history and current concepts in water resource management, water conflict, water law, and water economics. The course emphasizes Canadian and global water management issues of the 21st century, including water regulation, climate change, drinking water availability, water quality, eutrophication, and freshwater biodiversity. Prerequisite: *30.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 250 - Water Resource Management

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

The course introduces basic hydrological principles, the global water cycle, global demand and supply of freshwater, history and current concepts in water resource management, water conflict, water law, and water economics. The course emphasizes Canadian and global water management issues of the 21st century, including water regulation, climate change, drinking water availability, water quality, eutrophication, and freshwater biodiversity. Prerequisite: 30 units.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

A philosophical and sociological exploration of historical and contemporary perspectives on human-environmental relationships and their implications. Explores these perspectives in a framework of critical thinking and through case studies.

★ 2 (fi 4)(EITHER, 7 DAYS)

Combines the concepts and practices of environmental, conservation and forest sciences in an off-campus field experience. Proficiency in sampling, identification, and measurement of biophysical components of terrestrial and aquatic environments is emphasized. Prerequisites: *30 and REN R 110. REN R 205, REN R 210 and REN R 120 are recommended. Students must complete this course prior to completion of the final *30 of their program. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 290 - Field Skills in Environmental, Conservation, and Forest Sciences

★ 2 (fi 4)(EITHER, 7 DAYS)

Combines the concepts and practices of environmental, conservation and forest sciences in an off-campus field experience. Proficiency in sampling, identification, and measurement of biophysical components of terrestrial and aquatic environments is emphasized. Prerequisites: 30 units and REN R 110. REN R 205, REN R 210 and REN R 120 are recommended. Students must take this course after their second program year and prior to completion of the final 30 units of their program. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

★ 1 (fi 2)(EITHER, 4 DAYS)

Focuses on specialized field skills and their application in forest sciences. The course involves off-campus field experiences. Pre- or corequisite: REN R 290. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi VAR)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

Directed study in the multiple aspects of renewable resources. Open to second year (or higher) students upon consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Principles and practical techniques currently applied in land reclamation and restoration including: (1) landscape and soil reconstruction practices; (2) passive and active revegetation practices, taking into account the interaction between biotic and abiotic components; and (3) regulations governing land reclamation after industrial disturbance. Prerequisites: REN R 120, REN R 210, and one of REN R 250 or REN R 350.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Principles and elements of environmental assessment with an interdisciplinary focus. Topics include types of environmental assessments and when to use them, the Alberta and Canadian environmental assessment processes, the relevant legal framework, sampling and pathways of effects for different biophysical components, mitigation of environmental impacts and assessment of risk. Prerequisites: *60 and one of REN R 290 or REN R 299. One course each on soils, plants, wildlife, and water are recommended.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 307 - Environmental Assessment Principles and Methods

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Principles and elements of environmental assessment with an interdisciplinary focus. Topics include types of environmental assessments and when to use them, the Alberta and Canadian environmental assessment processes, the relevant legal framework, sampling and pathways of effects for different biophysical components, mitigation of environmental impacts and assessment of risk. Prerequisites: 60 units and one of REN R 290 or REN R 299. One course each on soils, plants, wildlife, and water are recommended.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Chemical, physical, and biological properties and processes of soil in relation to site and the growth of forest vegetation; nutrient cycling; influences of surface soil erosion, fertilization, and fire upon forest soil productivity: forest land classification. Prerequisite: REN R 210.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Study of physiological processes in trees. Emphasis on primary and secondary metabolism, gas exchange, transport processes, growth, and environmental effects. Prerequisite: CHEM 101 and (BIOL 107 or PL SC 221) recommended.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Exploration of key concepts regarding the ecology of forest ecosystems at varying temporal and spatial scales. Emphasis will be on relationships between biotic and abiotic components of the ecosystem. Topics covered will include flows of energy and matter, ecosystem dynamics, forest landscapes and biodiversity, impacts of natural and anthropogenic disturbance, forest conservation and ecosystem management. Lab exercises during the first month are held outside. Prerequisite: BIOL 208. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Prerequisite: BIOL 208.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Forest regeneration principles and techniques; stand tending including fertilization, thinning, pruning and drainage; harvesting systems for reforestation; nursery practices; reforestation, the law and current practices. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Prerequisite: BIOL 208.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

This is an introduction to identification and conservation of the mosses of Alberta, with a strong emphasis on field identification. Students are introduced to the morphological characters used to identify Alberta mosses, with supplementary information about individual species' habitat affinities and distribution within Alberta. Lecture topics include basic morphology, conservation and management of species diversity, and rare/endangered species found within Alberta. Students learn to identify more than 110 species from the province's six major natural regions. Prerequisite: *30. PLSC 221 or BIOL 208 or equivalent are recommended.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 327 - The Mosses of Alberta: Conservation and Identification

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

This is an introduction to identification and conservation of the mosses of Alberta, with a strong emphasis on field identification. Students are introduced to the morphological characters used to identify Alberta mosses, with supplementary information about individual species' habitat affinities and distribution within Alberta. Lecture topics include basic morphology, conservation and management of species diversity, and rare/endangered species found within Alberta. Students learn to identify more than 110 species from the province's six major natural regions. Prerequisite: 30 units. PLSC 221 or BIOL 208 or equivalent are recommended.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

The course includes an introduction to the hydrology, biogeochemistry and ecology of wetland ecosystems. Topics covered include wetland classifications, geomorphic settings, distributions, functions and ecosystem services. Human use, alteration and management of wetlands are examined. An emphasis is placed on wetlands and wetland management in Western Canada, including boreal peatlands and prairie marshes. A full day field trip on a Saturday is required. Prerequisite: BIOL 208 or EAS 201. Not to be taken if credit received for BIOL 333. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Harvesting and transportation methods and technologies as applied to wood-harvesting operations. This is a general course for students who desire a basic knowledge of current technologies used to conduct forest operations. Normally offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: *60.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 335 - Forest Harvesting and Transport

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Harvesting and transportation methods and technologies as applied to wood-harvesting operations. This is a general course for students who desire a basic knowledge of current technologies used to conduct forest operations. Normally offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: 60 units.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Principles of forest fire science and management in Canadian forest ecosystems. Fire science fundamentals and their applications for addressing complex social, ecological and economic fire management challenges. Topics include fire as a natural disturbance process, mechanisms of fire ignition and spread, fire weather, fire behaviour, and fire occurrence prediction. Models, systems, analytical techniques and policies used to support fire management operations and decisions are explored in relation to contemporary fire management issues.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Soil formation, with emphasis on landscape processes as factors in soil development; pedogenic processes and their relation to environmental issues; soils; vegetation, and geological associations; kinds and distribution of soils in Canada; soil classification; field examination and computer-assisted learning of soils and their landscape. Field trips. Prerequisite: REN R 210. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 441.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

The anatomy and identification of woods; biological, chemical, and physical properties of wood and its components. Lumber, pulp and paper, and reconstituted wood products technologies. Concept of integrated utilization. Lab exercises may include field trips. May require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Principles of physical and land-use hydrology. The interaction of vegetation, soils, and storage processes with physiography and climate in regulation of hydrologic processes and hydrologic response of watersheds including effects of disturbance on these functions. Prerequisite: REN R 210.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Global soil and water resources and their current rates of degradation. The main processes of degradation (erosion, loss of organic matter, salinization, pollution) and their causes. Consequences of degradation and conservation of resources through improved land use practices. Prerequisite: REN R 210.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-2)

Introduction to the theoretical foundation for conservation science. Elements of population, community and landscape ecology will be reviewed, and their application to realworld challenges discussed. Objective is to provide students with the scientific tools to evaluate and develop conservation strategies for maintaining diversity in human-altered systems. Ethical and philosophical aspects of the sociopolitical arena in which conservation decisions are made and implemented are also explored. Not to be taken if credit received for ENCS 364 or BIOL 367. Prerequisites: *60, and BIOL 208 or (BIOL 108 and REN R 110).

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 364 - Principles of Managing Natural Diversity

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-2)

Introduction to the theoretical foundation for conservation science. Elements of population, community and landscape ecology will be reviewed, and their application to realworld challenges discussed. Objective is to provide students with the scientific tools to evaluate and develop conservation strategies for maintaining diversity in human-altered systems. Ethical and philosophical aspects of the sociopolitical arena in which conservation decisions are made and implemented are also explored. Not to be taken if credit received for ENCS 364 or BIOL 367. Prerequisites: 30 units, and BIOL 208 or (BIOL 108 and REN R 110).

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

A study of landscape properties - pattern, process and scale - and their relationship to broad-scale ecological and environmental issues in northern systems. Prerequisite: REN R 364.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Principles and practices of restoring ecosystem structure, function and biodiversity after natural or anthropogenic disturbances. The course focuses on ecological theory and how to apply it to ecological restoration. Topics include landscape processes and connectivity, soil-plant processes, techniques, philosophy and ethics and societal aspects of ecological restoration. Prerequisite: BIOL 208.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-1)

Basic principles in plant genetics and resource utilization including tree improvement and reclamation will be covered. Regular lectures will be supplemented with guest lectures and one lab exercise or field trip per month, an individual or group term report and a group report presentation/poster will be assigned. Lab exercises may include field trips, with times to be confirmed. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Prerequisite: *30.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 368 - Management and Utilization of Forest Genetic Resources

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-1)

Basic principles in plant genetics and resource utilization including tree improvement and reclamation will be covered. Regular lectures will be supplemented with guest lectures and one lab exercise or field trip per month, an individual or group term report and a group report presentation/poster will be assigned. Lab exercises may include field trips, with times to be confirmed. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Prerequisite: 30 units.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Principles of ecology as applied to the management of fisheries and wildlife communities. Topics include the growth and regulation of populations, interactions among species and their environments, tools and techniques used to assess and manage fisheries and wildlife. Special emphasis will be placed applying knowledge using case studies and class exercises to demonstrate key principles. Prerequisite: BIOL 208.

★ 3 (fi VAR)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

Directed study in the multiple aspects of renewable resources. Open to third or fourth year students upon consent of instructor. Some sections require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 12)(TWO TERM, VARIABLE)

Directed research, with the intent of preparing the student for graduate studies. Generally undertaken in the fourth year of study, over the course of the fall and winter terms and results in an undergraduate thesis. Students wishing to enrol must obtain permission from an instructor, as well as the Associate Chair, Undergraduate, Department of Renewable Resources. Prerequisite: *60 and consent of instructor.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 402A - Directed Research in Renewable Resources

★ 3 (fi 12)(TWO TERM, VARIABLE)

Directed research, with the intent of preparing the student for graduate studies. Generally undertaken in the fourth year of study, over the course of the fall and winter terms and results in an undergraduate thesis. Students wishing to enrol must obtain permission from an instructor, as well as the Associate Chair, Undergraduate, Department of Renewable Resources. Prerequisite: 60 units and consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 12)(TWO TERM, VARIABLE)

Directed research, with the intent of preparing the student for graduate studies. Generally undertaken in the fourth year of study, over the course of the fall and winter terms and results in an undergraduate thesis. Students wishing to enrol must obtain permission from an instructor, as well as the Associate Chair, Undergraduate, Department of Renewable Resources. Prerequisite: *60 and consent of instructor.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 402B - Directed Research in Renewable Resources

★ 3 (fi 12)(TWO TERM, VARIABLE)

Directed research, with the intent of preparing the student for graduate studies. Generally undertaken in the fourth year of study, over the course of the fall and winter terms and results in an undergraduate thesis. Students wishing to enrol must obtain permission from an instructor, as well as the Associate Chair, Undergraduate, Department of Renewable Resources. Prerequisite: 60 units and consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

Individual study. Problems in specialized areas of forest science. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Principles, complexity, and diversity of agroforestry. Classification of agroforestry systems. Agroforestry systems in North America, specifically Canada. Plant and soil aspects of and interactions among the components in agroforestry systems. Use of agroforestry systems to enhance land productivity and sustainability. Socioeconomic aspects of agroforestry. Prerequisite: 60 units of university courses.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Abundance, distribution, behaviour, and geochemical cycling of trace elements in the environment, including micronutrients essential to plants and animals, and potentially toxic heavy metals; geochemical behaviour of trace elements in the hydrosphere-biosphere-atmosphere system and the relative importance of natural and anthropogenic contributions to the cycling of these elements.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Stress physiology of trees and tree seedlings; mechanisms of stress action and stress resistance; effects of silvicultural practices on growth and physiology; planting stress. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Readings, discussions and exercises on current topics in silviculture. Possible topics include: forest microsites, forest competition, plantation forestry, partial-cut systems, or intensive management. Normally offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: REN R 323.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 1-0-2)

An introduction to the identification, biology, and ecology of lichens in Alberta, which comprise a diverse and under-studied component of Alberta's flora. An emphasis on current research questions and methods. Combined lecture and laboratory, including microscopy, chemical testing, and interpreting morphology. Term project decided upon by students, and may include original research in taxonomy, ecology or lichen biomonitoring. Students learn to identify more than 80 species from across Alberta. Normally offered in alternate years.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 0-0-3)

This course is a combination of lecture/lab and directed studies to develop advanced GIS skills. A focus of the course is an individual spatial analysis project. Prerequisite: EAS 221, FOREN 201, or REN R 201.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

The purpose of this course is to expose students to key themes in science policy in the Canadian North, and to prepare students for careers at the northern science-policy interface. Case studies from the Canadian North will be used to explore the main themes of the course. Offered at Yukon University only. Prerequisite: *60.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 427 - Science Policy and Canada's North

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

The purpose of this course is to expose students to key themes in science policy in the Canadian North, and to prepare students for careers at the northern science-policy interface. Case studies from the Canadian North will be used to explore the main themes of the course. Offered at Yukon University only. Prerequisite: 60 units.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-2)

Analytical techniques used by renewable resource managers for management of wildland areas for single or multiple outputs; problems of defining optimality when confronted with competing uses and multiple outputs. Prerequisite: *60. REN R 215 and (AREC 214 or *3 MATH)

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 430 - Forest Resources Management

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-2)

Analytical techniques used by renewable resource managers for management of wildland areas for single or multiple outputs; problems of defining optimality when confronted with competing uses and multiple outputs. Prerequisite: 60 units. REN R 215 and (AREC 214 or 3 units in MATH)

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-2)

Problem solving, decision making and planning in relation to the management of forest resources. Application of models and related tools. Public involvement and issues management will be addressed. Prerequisites: REN R 323, REN R 430 and one of REN R 295 or REN R 299.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 2-1S-0)

This course will cover various aspects of disturbance ecology, including concepts of disturbance frequency, severity, intensity; ecological resilience and resistance and ecosystem responses to and recovery from disturbance. Students will define what a disturbance is and critically evaluate disturbance types and their characteristics in different ecosystems and their implications for conservation, sustainability of ecosystems, and application to reclamation / restoration. Prerequisites: *60 and BIOL 208.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 440 - Disturbance Ecology Fundamentals

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 2-1S-0)

This course will cover various aspects of disturbance ecology, including concepts of disturbance frequency, severity, intensity; ecological resilience and resistance and ecosystem responses to and recovery from disturbance. Students will define what a disturbance is and critically evaluate disturbance types and their characteristics in different ecosystems and their implications for conservation, sustainability of ecosystems, and application to reclamation / restoration. Prerequisites: 60 units and BIOL 208.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Introduction to the main components of the soil biota; the metabolic and molecular diversity of microbial populations and their role in soil processes; the microbiology and biochemistry of decomposition of organic matter in soil; biogeochemical cycling of N, P, S, Si, base cations and metals; and the application of soil microbiology to selected environmental problems. Prerequisite: REN R 210.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Quantitative characterization of soil physical properties. Description and measurement of soil physical properties and transport processes in soils. Examples from areas of land resource management, soil remediation, agriculture, and forestry will be used to illustrate the principles. Prerequisite: *60. REN R 210 recommended.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 443 - Soil Physics

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Quantitative characterization of soil physical properties. Description and measurement of soil physical properties and transport processes in soils. Examples from areas of land resource management, soil remediation, agriculture, and forestry will be used to illustrate the principles. Prerequisite: 60 units. REN R 210 recommended.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Chemical processes in soil and related terrestrial environments and the consequences of these processes as they relate to soil productivity, environmental quality and pollution of soil and water. The course describes fundamental chemical concepts such as soil solution and solid phase chemistry, sorption phenomena, ion exchange, oxidation-reduction reactions and speciation of metals. These concepts are used to predict the fate (distribution, transport, bioavailability and transformation) of inorganic and organic contaminants in soil. The chemical principles provide fundamental knowledge to develop soil reclamation strategies and nutrient management practices for enhanced crop production. Prerequisites: *3 CHEM and REN R 210.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 444 - Environmental Soil Chemistry

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Chemical processes in soil and related terrestrial environments and the consequences of these processes as they relate to soil productivity, environmental quality and pollution of soil and water. The course describes fundamental chemical concepts such as soil solution and solid phase chemistry, sorption phenomena, ion exchange, oxidation-reduction reactions and speciation of metals. These concepts are used to predict the fate (distribution, transport, bioavailability and transformation) of inorganic and organic contaminants in soil. The chemical principles provide fundamental knowledge to develop soil reclamation strategies and nutrient management practices for enhanced crop production. Prerequisites: 3 units in CHEM and REN R 210.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Essential plant nutrients; driving factors of nutrient bioavailability and cycling; plant uptake and utilization of nutrients; evaluation of soil fertility in terms of nutrient deficiencies and responses; management of soil fertility challenges from both productivity and environmental perspectives; assessing options of nutrient sources. Lab exercises may include field trips. May require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Prerequisite: REN R 210.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-2)

The basic principles by which the cycles of water, carbon, and nutrients through soils, plants, and the atmosphere are controlled in terrestrial ecosystems under different climates. Interrelationships among water, carbon and nutrient cycles in natural and managed ecosystems that have developed in different climatic zones. Environmental consequences of human intervention in the cycles for food and fibre production in different ecosystems. Prerequisite: REN R 210. PL SC 221 or BOT 340 recommended.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

This course focuses on understanding and managing insects and diseases in natural and managed forest ecosystems and characterizes how they interact with the environment and each other to affect ecosystem functions and properties. Prerequisites: minimum of *54 university level credits and BIOL 208.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 447 - Forest Health

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

This course focuses on understanding and managing insects and diseases in natural and managed forest ecosystems and characterizes how they interact with the environment and each other to affect ecosystem functions and properties. Prerequisites: minimum of 54 units at university level and BIOL 208.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-1S-0)

Measurement, modelling, and forecasting the future development of attributes of trees and forest stands. Tree taper, volume, and biomass estimation, recruitment, growth, yield, and survival functions, site quality estimation, and simulation modelling including linkages to forest inventory, applications of remote sensing, and reference data programs for monitoring and model development. Prerequisite: REN R 215.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Land-management issues that influence the sustainability of both agriculture and the land resource. Role of ecological processes in determining sustainability and the development and adoption of practices that facilitate long-term viability of both agriculture and biophysical resources. The concept of the agro-ecosystem and application of ecological principles to agricultural land management. Use of environmental indicators to measure and predict long-term sustainability of agricultural land management. Prerequisites: *60 at university level including (REN R 210 or SOILS 210), and (BIOL 208 or PL SC 221).

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 450 - Environmentally Sustainable Agriculture

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Land-management issues that influence the sustainability of both agriculture and the land resource. Role of ecological processes in determining sustainability and the development and adoption of practices that facilitate long-term viability of both agriculture and biophysical resources. The concept of the agro-ecosystem and application of ecological principles to agricultural land management. Use of environmental indicators to measure and predict long-term sustainability of agricultural land management. Prerequisites: 60 units at university level including (REN R 210 or SOILS 210), and (BIOL 208 or PL SC 221).

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 0-3S-0)

Seminar discussions/presentations on issues and methods in forest management and the production, protection, and regulation of wildland water resources. Relationship between disturbance (natural/anthropogenic) and water yield, regime, water quality. Watershed management as a component of integrated wildland management (ECA procedures, hydrologic modeling, stream protection zones (SPZs), best management practices (BMPs) and cumulative effects assessment). Prerequisite: *60 at university level.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 452 - Forest Watershed Management

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 0-3S-0)

Seminar discussions/presentations on issues and methods in forest management and the production, protection, and regulation of wildland water resources. Relationship between disturbance (natural/anthropogenic) and water yield, regime, water quality. Watershed management as a component of integrated wildland management (ECA procedures, hydrologic modeling, stream protection zones (SPZs), best management practices (BMPs) and cumulative effects assessment). Prerequisite: 60 units at university level.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

An overview of the diversity of management practices among protected areas, including national and provincial parks, interpreted in the context of the ongoing development of ecological science and environmentalism. Prerequisite: REN R 260. REN R 364 recommended.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

An overview of evolutionary processes and their role in shaping animals and plants in northern environments; adaptations to extreme conditions and potential effects of climate change will be explored. Prerequisite: BIOL 208.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Theoretical and applied considerations for maintaining endangered, threatened and rare populations and species, including provincial, national and international strategies. Contributory factors to decline and extinction are discussed, as are various recovery programs. Prerequisite: REN R 364.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITH/SP/SU, VARIABLE)

Field trip studies with a focus on environmental and conservation biology topics. Course content and offerings vary from year to year, and have included study trips on Northern Ecosystems, National Parks, and Protected Areas, Arctic Tundra, the Florida Everglades, and Galapagos Islands. Prerequisite: *9 in biological or ecological topics. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 465 - Environmental and Conservation Field Studies

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITH/SP/SU, VARIABLE)

Field trip studies with a focus on environmental and conservation biology topics. Course content and offerings vary from year to year, and have included study trips on Northern Ecosystems, National Parks, and Protected Areas, Arctic Tundra, the Florida Everglades, and Galapagos Islands. Prerequisite: 9 units in biological or ecological topics. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Current and projected impacts of climate change on the circumpolar north, including the land, its biota, northern communities, and drivers that shape these interactions.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

An overview of theories and methods of communication, as applied to environmental topics and general audiences. Includes discussion of environmental interpretation, science communication, audio-visual communication, and media skills.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Principles and issues in conserving and managing plant and animal genetic resources from the global perspective. Lectures will be supplemented with case studies. Students are assigned tasks, individually and in groups. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Introduction to the theory and application of biodiversity with an emphasis on quantitative analysis of biodiversity data. The course covers the concepts of biodiversity (genetic, species and ecosystem), dynamics of species populations, diversity measurements, estimation of species richness, diversity patterns (species-abundance, species-area, distribution-abundance, local-regional, beta diversity, richness-productivity, etc.), mechanisms of biodiversity maintenance, and methods and models for biodiversity conservation. Laboratory session involves using statistical software R for analyzing various real diversity data. Prerequisite: REN R 364.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

In-depth analysis of topical issues in northern resource management, including both ecological and socio-political dimensions, and emphasizing underlying scientific principles and adaptive management strategies.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-1)

Issues, principles and science surrounding sustainable use of wildlife resources. Hunting, angling and trapping for subsistence, recreational and commercial purposes. Sociopolitical dimensions of harvest regulation, wildlife administration, and human demographic changes. Field trips. Prerequisite: minimum of *6 of REN R or Biological Sciences courses at the 300-level or higher. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 474 - Utilization of Wildlife Resources

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-1)

Issues, principles and science surrounding sustainable use of wildlife resources. Hunting, angling and trapping for subsistence, recreational and commercial purposes. Sociopolitical dimensions of harvest regulation, wildlife administration, and human demographic changes. Field trips. Prerequisite: minimum of 6 units of REN R or Biological Sciences courses at the 300-level or higher. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-1)

Fisheries and wildlife systems management. Approaches covered, include: age/growth analysis, demographics, systems analysis, and other computer and modelling applications in fisheries and wildlife management. Prerequisite: *60 with at least *6 in Biology or Ecology.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 476 - Advanced Fisheries and Wildlife Management

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-1)

Fisheries and wildlife systems management. Approaches covered, include: age/growth analysis, demographics, systems analysis, and other computer and modelling applications in fisheries and wildlife management. Prerequisite: 60 units with at least 6 units in Biology or Ecology.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-1.5)

Focuses on problem formulation, method selection, and interpretation of statistical analysis. Covers data management and data visualization, statistical tests for parametric, non-parametric and binomial data, linear and non-linear regression approaches. Participants will gain general statistical literacy and learn how to visualize and analyze data with open-source software packages. Prerequisite: *60. *3 introductory statistics recommended.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 480 - Applied Statistics for Environmental Sciences

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-1.5)

Focuses on problem formulation, method selection, and interpretation of statistical analysis. Covers data management and data visualization, statistical tests for parametric, non-parametric and binomial data, linear and non-linear regression approaches. Participants will gain general statistical literacy and learn how to visualize and analyze data with open-source software packages. Prerequisite: 60 units. 3 units in introductory statistics recommended.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-3S-0)

Principles and methods of biological, chemical, and physical remediation of soils contaminated by hazardous chemicals and other pollutants. Topics include soil-contaminant interactions, microbial processes used in remediation and process fundamentals of remediation technologies including bioremediation and phytoremediation. Other important environmental issues associated with growing industrial activities such as off-shore oil spills, and production of red mud sludge and oil sands tailings are included with potential remediation strategies to address those issues. This course describes approaches to managing contaminated sites incorporating Canadian guidelines and soil quality criteria for soil remediation. Prerequisite: *60. REN R 444 recommended.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 482 - Soil Remediation

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-3S-0)

Principles and methods of biological, chemical, and physical remediation of soils contaminated by hazardous chemicals and other pollutants. Topics include soil-contaminant interactions, microbial processes used in remediation and process fundamentals of remediation technologies including bioremediation and phytoremediation. Other important environmental issues associated with growing industrial activities such as off-shore oil spills, and production of red mud sludge and oil sands tailings are included with potential remediation strategies to address those issues. This course describes approaches to managing contaminated sites incorporating Canadian guidelines and soil quality criteria for soil remediation. Prerequisite: 60 units. REN R 444 recommended.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-3S-0)

Chemical, biological, and physical properties of anthropogenic wastes, their reactions in the soil environment, theory and practice for their chemical and biological immobilization and use in agriculture, forest, and urban lands. Prerequisite: *60.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 483 - Waste Management and Utilization

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-3S-0)

Chemical, biological, and physical properties of anthropogenic wastes, their reactions in the soil environment, theory and practice for their chemical and biological immobilization and use in agriculture, forest, and urban lands. Prerequisite: 60 units.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Contemporary approaches to land-use planning applied to northern systems in Canada, addressing the integration of social, environmental and economic values, and maintenance of ecosystem integrity through proactive measures. Prerequisite: *90.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 491 - Land-use Planning in Canada's North

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Contemporary approaches to land-use planning applied to northern systems in Canada, addressing the integration of social, environmental and economic values, and maintenance of ecosystem integrity through proactive measures. Prerequisite: 90 units.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-3S-0)

Principles, practices, and philosophy of reclamation of degraded lands. Team based land reclamation project required. Prerequisites: *90 including introductory courses in soil science, hydrology, ecology, and vegetation science; and REN R 307 or ENCS 307 or equivalent; and *3 in vegetation science at the 300-or 400-level and *6 in soil science at the 300-or 400-level. Prerequisites or corequisites: *3 in vegetation science at the 300-or 400-level; and *3 in soil science at the 300- or 400-level; and REN R 482 or ENCS 455. ENCS 406 recommended.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 495 - Land Reclamation

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-3S-0)

Principles, practices, and philosophy of reclamation of degraded lands. Team based land reclamation project required. Prerequisites: 90 units including introductory courses in soil science, hydrology, ecology, and vegetation science; and REN R 307 or ENCS 307 or equivalent; and 3 units in vegetation science at the 300-or 400-level and 6 units in soil science at the 300-or 400-level. Prerequisites or corequisites: 3 units in vegetation science at the 300-or 400-level; and 3 units in soil science at the 300- or 400-level; and REN R 482 or ENCS 455. ENCS 406 recommended.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 1-0-3)

Conservation Planning is a quantitative, inter-disciplinary applied science that prioritizes conservation actions in a spatially-explicit manner. It seeks to understand trade-offs between biological, social and economic factors associated with land use activities. The course is a combination of computing labs that demonstrate key principles and software, lectures to discuss key issues, and a student-led final project to apply key concepts and quantitative techniques. Special emphasis is given to Alberta's land use planning challenges, although North American examples and exercises are also used. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor, or (REN R 364 or ENCS 364) and (REN R 201 or EAS 221) and (STATS 141 or SCI 151) and *81 university level credits.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 496 - Conservation Planning

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 1-0-2)

Conservation Planning is a quantitative, inter-disciplinary applied science that prioritizes conservation actions in a spatially-explicit manner. It seeks to understand trade-offs between biological, social and economic factors associated with land use activities. The course is a combination of computing labs that demonstrate key principles and software, lectures to discuss key issues, and a student-led final project to apply key concepts and quantitative techniques. Special emphasis is given to Alberta's land use planning challenges, although North American examples and exercises are also used. Prerequisite: (REN R 201 or EAS 221), prerequisite or corequisite: REN R 364, and 90 units of university level credits.

★ 1 (fi VAR)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

Directed study in the multiple aspects of renewable resources. Open to fourth year or graduate students upon consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Abundance, distribution, behaviour, and geochemical cycling of trace elements in the environment, including micronutrients essential to plants and animals, and potentially toxic heavy metals; geochemical behaviour of trace elements in the hydrosphere-biosphere-atmosphere system and the relative importance of natural and anthropogenic contributions to the cycling of these elements. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 418.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Stress physiology of trees and tree seedlings; mechanisms of stress action and stress resistance; effects of silvicultural practices on growth and physiology; planting stress. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 421 or REN R 725.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 1-0-2)

An introduction to the identification, biology, and ecology of lichens in Alberta, which comprise a diverse and under-studied component of Alberta's flora. An emphasis on current research questions and methods. Combined lecture and laboratory, including microscopy, chemical testing, and interpreting morphology. Term project decided upon by students, and may include original research in taxonomy, ecology or lichen biomonitoring. Students learn to identify more than 80 species from across Alberta. Normally offered in alternate years. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 424.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 0-0-3)

This course is a combination of lecture/lab and directed studies to develop advanced GIS skills. A focus of the course is an individual spatial analysis project. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 426 or REN R 712.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 526 - Geographical Information Systems Applications in Renewable Resources

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-0-3)

This course is a combination of lecture/lab and directed studies to develop advanced GIS skills. A focus of the course is an individual spatial analysis project. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 426 or REN R 712.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 2-1S-0)

This course will cover various aspects of disturbance ecology, including concepts of disturbance frequency, severity, intensity; ecological resilience and resistance and ecosystem responses to and recovery from disturbance. Students will define what a disturbance is and critically evaluate disturbance types and their characteristics in different ecosystems and their implications for conservation, sustainability of ecosystems, and application to reclamation/restoration. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 440 or REN R 732.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Mathematical programming, decision analysis and computer simulation applied to natural resource management problems. Prerequisites: AREC 214 or MATH 120 and at least *60 credit in university courses.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 535 - Operations Research for Natural Resource Management

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Mathematical programming, decision analysis and computer simulation applied to natural resource management problems. Prerequisites: AREC 214 or MATH 120 and at least 60 units credit in university courses.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Soil classification with a focus on soil genesis as influenced by soil forming factors and processes. Spatial variability of soil types within landscapes in association with vegetation, parent geological materials, hillslope hydrology and microclimate. Soils as components of ecosystems and their relation to environmental issues. Distribution of soils in Canada. Field trips. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 341, REN R 441 or REN R 741.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Introduction to the main components of the soil biota; the metabolic and molecular diversity of microbial populations and their role in soil processes; the microbiology and biochemistry of decomposition of organic matter in soil; biogeochemical cycling of N, P, S, Si, base cations and metals; and the application of soil microbiology to selected environmental problems. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 442 or REN R 742.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Description, measurement and modeling of soil physical properties, and mass and energy transport processes in soils. Applications of theory to managed and natural ecosystems.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-1)

Essential plant nutrients; driving factors of nutrient bioavailability and cycling; plant uptake and utilization of nutrients; evaluation of soil fertility in terms of nutrient deficiencies and responses; management of soil fertility challenges from both productivity and environmental perspectives; assessment of options of nutrient sources. Lab exercises may include field trips. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 445 or REN R 745. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 545 - Advanced Plant Nutrition

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Essential plant nutrients; driving factors of nutrient bioavailability and cycling; plant uptake and utilization of nutrients; evaluation of soil fertility in terms of nutrient deficiencies and responses; management of soil fertility challenges from both productivity and environmental perspectives; assessment of options of nutrient sources. Lab exercises may include field trips. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 445 or REN R 745. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-1S-0)

Measurement, modelling, and forecasting the future development of attributes of trees and forest stands. Tree taper, volume, and biomass estimation, recruitment, growth, yield, and survival functions, site quality estimation, and simulation modelling including linkages to forest inventory, applications of remote sensing, and reference data programs for monitoring and model development. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 448. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-2S-0)

This course offers more detailed understanding of chemical concepts such as soil solution and solid phase chemistry, sorption phenomena, ion exchange, oxidation-reduction reactions and speciation of metals. The course also includes the topics related to mineral solubility, carbonate system, and application of stable isotopes. Additional bi-weekly sessions will be held for discussion. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Land-management issues that influence the sustainability of both agriculture and the land resource. Role of ecological processes in determining sustainability and the development and adoption of practices that facilitate long-term viability of both agriculture and biophysical resources. The concept of the agroecosystem and application of ecological principles to agricultural land management. Use of environmental indicators to measure and predict longterm sustainability of agricultural land management. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 450 or REN R 752.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 552 - Agricultural Sustainability and the Environment

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Sustainability assessment of land ecosystems and land resources management. Implementation of sustainable development goals and pillars of sustainability as frameworks for evaluating cases of study around the globe when focusing on multifunctional land ecosystems. Design and modelling of whole farming systems while identifying externalities, developmental phases, and ecological valence. Analyses of underlying ecological processes and adoption of sustainable management. Long-term evolution of environmental problems and opportunities associated with agricultural landscapes and the biosphere. Conceptualization of sustainability. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 450 or REN R 752

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

An overview of the diversity of management practices among protected areas, including national and provincial parks, interpreted in the context of the ongoing development of ecological science and environmentalism. Prerequisite: REN R 260. REN R 364 recommended. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 462 or 766.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

An overview of theories and methods of communication, as applied to environmental topics and general audiences. Includes discussion of environmental interpretation, science communication, audio-visual communication, and media skills. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 467 or 764.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-2)

Introduction to the theory and application of biodiversity with emphasis on quantitative analysis of biodiversity data. The course covers the concepts of biodiversity (genetic, species and ecosystem), dynamics of species populations, diversity measurements, estimation of species richness, synthetic patterns of species diversity (species-abundance, species-area, distribution-abundance, local-regional, beta diversity, richness-productivity, etc.), theories of biodiversity maintenance, species distribution models, and methods and models of biodiversity conservation including estimating species extinction risk and viable population size. Laboratory session involves using statistical software R for analyzing various real diversity data. REN R 569 is built on REN R 469 with a focus on problem solving skills, individual projects and advanced R programming. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 469.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-1)

Fisheries and wildlife systems management. Approaches covered, include: age/growth analysis, demographics, systems analysis, and other computer and modelling applications in fisheries and wildlife management. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 476 or REN R 772.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-1.5)

Focuses on problem formulation, method selection, and interpretation of statistical analysis. Covers data management and data visualization, statistical tests for parametric, nonparametric and binomial data, linear and non-linear regression approaches. Participants engage in problem-based learning by analyzing data from their thesis research project. Students without a suitable dataset should enroll in two or more *1 REN R 58X courses instead. Prerequisite: *3 introductory statistics recommended.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 580 - Applied Statistics for Environmental Sciences

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-1.5)

Focuses on problem formulation, method selection, and interpretation of statistical analysis. Covers data management and data visualization, statistical tests for parametric, nonparametric and binomial data, linear and non-linear regression approaches. Participants engage in problem-based learning by analyzing data from their thesis research project. Students without a suitable dataset should enroll in two or more 1 unit REN R 58X courses instead. Prerequisite: 3 units in introductory statistics recommended.

★ 1.5 (fi 3)(FIRST, 1.5-0-1.5)

Methods for exploring, analyzing and presenting data. Data organization, outlier identification, transformations. Data displays for grouped, bivariate, and time series data. Summary statistics for parametric and non-parametric data. Concept of standard errors and confidence intervals. Design of scientific tables, two-way tables. Participants learn how to generate publication-quality graphs and tables with open-source software packages.

★ 1.5 (fi 3)(FIRST, 1.5-0-1.5)

Concepts of inferential statistics and null hypothesis testing, statistical versus scientific hypothesis testing, problem formulation, assumptions, and interpretation. One- and two-sample inferences for population means and proportions, one and two-way analysis of variance, linear correlation and regression, classical non-parametric statistics. Participants will gain general statistical literacy and learn how to implement common statistical tests with open-source software packages.

★ 1.5 (fi 3)(SECOND, 1.5-0-1.5)

Concepts and application of analysis of variance to experimental data, including blocked, nested, factorial and split plot designs, and repeated measures. Covers the concepts of fixed and random effects, multiple comparisons, analysis of covariance. Participants learn how to design and evaluate complex field and laboratory experiments with open-source software packages. Prerequisite: knowledge equivalent to REN R 581 and REN R 582 is required.

★ 1.5 (fi 3)(SECOND, 1.5-0-1.5)

Focuses on analyzing complex biological or environmental data for the purpose of prediction and scientific hypothesis testing. Covers multiple regression for a continuous response, logistic regression for a binary response, and log-linear models for count data, non-linear regression and generalized additive models for non-linear relationships, path analysis using structural equation modeling. Prerequisite: knowledge equivalent to REN R 581 and REN R 582 is required.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 0-3S-0)

An examination of current topics in land reclamation, ecological restoration, revegetation and remediation of degraded lands. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 1-0-3)

Conservation Planning is a quantitative, inter-disciplinary applied science that prioritizes conservation actions in a spatially-explicit manner. It seeks to understand trade-offs between biological, social and economic factors associated with land use activities. The course is a combination of computing labs that demonstrate key principles and software, lectures to discuss key issues, and a student-led final project to apply key concepts and quantitative techniques. Special emphasis is given to Alberta's land use planning challenges, although North American examples and exercises are also used. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 496 or REN R 796.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 596 - Conservation Planning

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 1-0-2)

Conservation Planning is a quantitative, inter-disciplinary applied science that prioritizes conservation actions in a spatially-explicit manner. It seeks to understand trade-offs between biological, social and economic factors associated with land use activities. The course is a combination of computing labs that demonstrate key principles and software, lectures to discuss key issues, and a student-led final project to apply key concepts and quantitative techniques. Special emphasis is given to Alberta's land use planning challenges, although North American examples and exercises are also used. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 496 or REN R 796.

★ 1 (fi 2)(FIRST, 1.5-0-0)

Prepares graduate students to function in a research environment. Focuses on the development of communication and presentation skills, the publication process, and proposal preparation. The grade is credit/no credit.

★ 1 (fi 2)(SECOND, 0-2.5S-0)

Prepares graduate students to function in a research environment. Focus is applied communication of research. All students are required to present a seminar, present a research poster, and critique a seminar. Attendance at the seminars and poster session is required. If possible, REN R 604 should not be taken until the student has some research results to present. The grade is credit/no credit.

★ 1 (fi 2)(SECOND, 1.5-0-0)

Prepares PhD students to function in a research environment. Focuses on research management, best practices in scientific research, and ethics and philosophy of science. The grade is credit/no credit.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Focuses on visualizing and analyzing complex biological or environmental data for the purpose of prediction and scientific hypothesis testing. Covers classical and modern approaches to ordination and classification, direct and indirect gradient analysis, and models of ecological and environmental interactions. Participants engage in problem-based learning by analyzing data from their thesis research project. Students without a suitable dataset should enroll in two or more *1 REN R 58X courses instead. Prerequisite: *3 introductory statistics recommended.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 690 - Multivariate Statistics and Machine Learning for the Environmental Sciences

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Covers methods for visualization, analysis and prediction for complex biological or environmental data. Includes classical and modern approaches to ordination and classification, analysis of multivariate relationships, and the application of deep neural networks and other machine learning tools for prediction. Participants engage in problem-based learning by analyzing data from their thesis research project. Students without a suitable dataset should enroll in two or more 1 unit REN R 58X courses instead. Prerequisite: 3 units introductory statistics recommended.

★ 2 (fi 4)(EITHER, 7 DAYS)

Combines the concepts and practices of environmental, conservation and forest sciences in an off-campus field experience. Proficiency in sampling, identification, and measurement of biophysical components of terrestrial and aquatic environments is emphasized. Students in the Master of Forestry program should complete this course in their first term. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 290.

★ 1 (fi 2)(EITHER, 4 DAYS)

Focuses on specialized field skills and their application in professional forest management. The course involves off-campus field experiences. Students in the Master of Forestry program should complete this course in their first term. Pre- or co-requisite: REN R 701 or REN R 290. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 295.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Principles and elements of environmental assessment with an interdisciplinary focus. Topics include types of environmental assessments and when to use them, the Alberta and Canadian environmental assessment processes, the relevant legal framework, sampling and pathways of effects for different biophysical components, mitigation of environmental impacts and assessment of risk. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 307.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Basic principles of spectral reflectance and emittance, and atmospheric effects as they apply to the acquisition and analysis of imagery; digital image analysis for geographical information systems; application to renewable resource inventory and management and environmental impact assessment. Not available for students with credit in REN R 410. Available only to students in MAg, MBA/MAg, MF, or MBA/MF, or by consent of Department.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Study of physiological processes in trees. Emphasis on primary and secondary metabolism, gas exchange, transport processes, growth, and environmental effects. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 321.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Exploration of key concepts regarding the ecology of forest ecosystems at varying temporal and spatial scales. Emphasis will be on relationships between biotic and abiotic components of the ecosystem. Topics covered will include flows of energy and matter, ecosystem dynamics, forest landscapes and biodiversity, impacts of natural and anthropogenic disturbance, forest conservation and ecosystem management. Lab exercises during the first month are held outside. May require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 322.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-3)

Forest regeneration principles and techniques; stand tending including fertilization, thinning, pruning and drainage; harvesting systems for reforestation; nursery practices; reforestation, the law and current practices. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 323. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Harvesting and transportation methods and technologies as applied to wood-harvesting operations. This is a general course for students who desire a basic knowledge of current technologies used to conduct forest operations. Normally offered in alternate years. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 335.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

The anatomy and identification of woods; biological, chemical, and physical properties of wood and its components. Lumber, pulp and paper, and reconstituted wood products technologies. Concept of integrated utilization. Lab exercises may include field trips. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 345.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Readings, discussions and exercises on current topics in silviculture. Possible topics include: forest microsites, forest competition, plantation forestry, partial-cut systems, or intensive management. Normally offered in alternate years. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 423.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-2)

Analytical techniques used by renewable resource managers for management of wildland areas for single or multiple outputs; problems of defining optimality when confronted with competing uses and multiple outputs. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 430.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-2)

Problem solving, decision making and planning in relation to the management of forest resources. Application of models and related tools. Public involvement and issues management will be addressed. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 431.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 728 - Integrated Forest Management

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-2)

Problem solving, decision making and planning in relation to the management of forest resources. Application of models and related tools. Public involvement and issues management will be addressed. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 431. Prerequisite: REN R 430 or REN R 727.

★ 3 (fi 6)(2ND TR S/S, VARIABLE)

Participation in a trip to a selected region is required as part of the course. Biophysical, social, historical and economic factors that influence forest conservation and management are examined; forest resources, ecological services, forest conservation and management practices, policies and regulations are evaluated and discussed. Students complete background research, participate in seminar discussions, and complete a report on the region visited. A different region is visited each year. Course may not be offered every year. Students must contact the instructor at least 4 months prior to the departure date. Requires payment of additional miscellaneous fees, including a non-refundable deposit that is due at least 3 months prior to the departure date. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Not available for students with credit in REN R 456 or FOR 456. Available only to students in MAg, MBA/MAg, MF, or MBA/MF, or by consent of Department.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Principles of physical and land-use hydrology. The interaction of vegetation, soils, and storage processes with physiography and climate in regulation of hydrologic processes and hydrologic response of watersheds including effects of disturbance on these functions. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 350.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 0-3S-0)

Seminar discussions/presentations on issues and methods in forest management and the production, protection, and regulation of wildland water resources. Relationship between disturbance (natural/anthropogenic) and water yield, regime, water quality. Watershed management as a component of integrated wildland management (ECA procedures, hydrologic modeling, stream protection zones (SPZs), best management practices (BMPs) and cumulative effects assessment). Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 452.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Principles of forest fire science and management in Canadian forest ecosystems. Fire science fundamentals and their applications for addressing complex social, ecological and economic fire management challenges. Topics include fire as a natural disturbance process, mechanisms of fire ignition and spread, fire weather, fire behaviour, and fire occurrence prediction. Models, systems, analytical techniques and policies used to support fire management operations and decisions are explored in relation to contemporary fire management issues. Intended for students in course based masters programs. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 340. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Chemical processes in soil and related terrestrial environments and the consequences of these processes as they relate to soil productivity, environmental quality and pollution of soil and water. The course describes fundamental chemical concepts such as soil solution and solid phase chemistry, sorption phenomena, ion exchange, oxidation-reduction reactions and speciation of metals. These concepts are used to predict the fate (distribution, transport, bioavailability and transformation) of inorganic and organic contaminants in soil. The chemical principles provide fundamental knowledge to develop soil reclamation strategies and nutrient management practices for enhanced crop production. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 444.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-2)

The basic principles by which the cycles of water, carbon, and nutrients through soils, plants, and the atmosphere are controlled in terrestrial ecosystems under different climates. Interrelationships among water, carbon and nutrient cycles in natural and managed ecosystems that have developed in different climatic zones. Environmental consequences of human intervention in the cycles for food and fibre production in different ecosystems. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 446.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

This course focuses on understanding and managing insects and diseases in natural and managed forest ecosystems and characterizes how they interact with the environment and each other to affect ecosystem functions and properties. Intended for students in course based masters programs. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 447. Prerequisites: *60, BIOL 208, and consent of instructor.

Starting: 2024-09-01 REN R 747 - Forest Health

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

This course focuses on understanding and managing insects and diseases in natural and managed forest ecosystems and characterizes how they interact with the environment and each other to affect ecosystem functions and properties. Intended for students in course based masters programs. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 447. Prerequisites: 60 units, BIOL 208, and consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

Chemical, physical, and biological properties and processes of soil in relation to site and the growth of forest vegetation; nutrient cycling; influences of surface soil erosion, fertilization, and fire upon forest soil productivity: forest land classification. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 314.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Global soil and water resources and their current rates of degradation. The main processes of degradation (erosion, loss of organic matter, salinization, pollution) and their causes. Consequences of degradation and conservation of resources through improved land use practices. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 360.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Principles, complexity, and diversity of agroforestry. Classification of agroforestry systems. Agroforestry systems in North America, specifically Canada. Plant and soil aspects of and interactions among the components in agroforestry systems. Use of agroforestry systems to enhance land productivity and sustainability. Socioeconomic aspects of agroforestry. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 414.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Principles and practices of restoring ecosystem structure, function and biodiversity after natural or anthropogenic disturbances. The course focuses on ecological theory and how to apply it to ecological restoration. Topics include landscape processes and connectivity, soil-plant processes, techniques, philosophy and ethics and societal aspects of ecological restoration. This course is intended for students in course based masters programs. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 366. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Principles and issues in conserving and managing plant and animal genetic resources from the global perspective. Lectures will be supplemented with case studies. Students are assigned tasks, individually and in groups. Not available for students with credit in REN R 468. Available only to students in MAg, MBA/MAg, MF, or MBA/MF, or by consent of Department.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-2)

) Introduction to the theoretical foundation for conservation science. Elements of population, community and landscape ecology will be reviewed, and their application to realworld challenges discussed. Objective is to provide students with the scientific tools to evaluate and develop conservation strategies for maintaining diversity in human-altered systems. Ethical and philosophical aspects of the sociopolitical arena in which conservation decisions are made and implemented are also explored. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 364.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-3)

This is an introduction to identification and conservation of the mosses of Alberta, with a strong emphasis on field identification. Students are introduced to the morphological characters used to identify Alberta mosses, with supplementary information about individual species habitat affinities and distribution within Alberta. Lecture topics include basic morphology, conservation and management of species diversity, and rare/ endangered species found within Alberta. Students learn to identify more than 110 species from the province's six major natural regions. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 327.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-1)

Basic principles in plant genetics and resource utilization including tree improvement and reclamation will be covered. Regular lectures will be supplemented with guest lectures and one lab exercise or field trip per month, an individual term report and presentation/discussion lead on a selected paper will be required. Lab exercises may include field trips, with times to be confirmed. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 368.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-1)

Issues, principles and science surrounding sustainable use of wildlife resources. Hunting, angling and trapping for subsistence, recreational and commercial purposes. Sociopolitical dimensions of harvest regulation, wildlife administration, and human demographic changes. Field trips. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 474.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Principles of ecology as applied to the management of fisheries and wildlife communities. Topics include the growth and regulation of populations, interactions among species and their environments, tools and techniques used to assess and manage fisheries and wildlife. Special emphasis will be placed applying knowledge using case studies and class exercises to demonstrate key principles. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 376.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-3S-0)

Principles and methods of biological, chemical, and physical remediation of soils contaminated by hazardous chemicals and other pollutants. Topics include soil-contaminant interactions, microbial processes used in remediation and process fundamentals of remediation technologies including bioremediation and phytoremediation. Other important environmental issues associated with growing industrial activities such as off-shore oil spills, and production of red mud sludge and oil sands tailings are included with potential remediation strategies to address those issues. This course describes approaches to managing contaminated sites incorporating Canadian guidelines and soil quality criteria for soil remediation. Students will review recent literature pertaining to soil remediation. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 482.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-3S-0)

Chemical, biological, and physical properties of anthropogenic wastes, their reactions in the soil environment, theory and practice for their chemical and biological immobilization and use in agriculture, forest, and urban lands. Not to be taken if credit received for REN R 483.

★ 3 (fi 12)(VAR, UNASSIGNED)

Required of all Soils MAg candidates in their final year. It does not usually involve collection of original data but makes use of published or unpublished data from other sources. The report is to be defended before a committee of three staff members, one member being from outside the Department of Renewable Resources.

★ 3 (fi 12)(VAR, UNASSIGNED)

Required of all Soils MAg candidates in their final year. It does not usually involve collection of original data but makes use of published or unpublished data from other sources. The report is to be defended before a committee of three staff members, one member being from outside the Department of Renewable Resources.

★ 6 (fi 12)(VAR, UNASSIGNED)

The final research project that comprises REN R 906 is a final capping exercise for the degrees of MAg and MF. Its practical and professional focus should integrate the core areas of study in the program. The successful completion of the project entails (1) a research topic approved by the supervisor; (2) the presentation of a draft research proposal; and (3) the presentation of the research as a written document to the supervisor. The project may take the form of any of the following: (1) a formal analysis of management practice, organizational processes or policy; (2) a formative or summative evaluation of a research project or program; (3) a case study, using secondary documents, survey data, or interviews; or (4) replication of a previous study, with either the introduction of a new variable or an analysis in a changed context.

★ 3 (fi 12)(VAR, UNASSIGNED)

The final research project that comprises REN R 906 is a final capping exercise for the degrees of MAg and MF. Its practical and professional focus should integrate the core areas of study in the program. The successful completion of the project entails (1) a research topic approved by the supervisor; (2) the presentation of a draft research proposal; and (3) the presentation of the research as a written document to the supervisor. The project may take the form of any of the following: (1) a formal analysis of management practice, organizational processes or policy; (2) a formative or summative evaluation of a research project or program; (3) a case study, using secondary documents, survey data, or interviews; or (4) replication of a previous study, with either the introduction of a new variable or an analysis in a changed context.

★ 3 (fi 12)(VAR, UNASSIGNED)

The final research project that comprises REN R 906 is a final capping exercise for the degrees of MAg and MF. Its practical and professional focus should integrate the core areas of study in the program. The successful completion of the project entails (1) a research topic approved by the supervisor; (2) the presentation of a draft research proposal; and (3) the presentation of the research as a written document to the supervisor. The project may take the form of any of the following: (1) a formal analysis of management practice, organizational processes or policy; (2) a formative or summative evaluation of a research project or program; (3) a case study, using secondary documents, survey data, or interviews; or (4) replication of a previous study, with either the introduction of a new variable or an analysis in a changed context.

★ 12 (fi 24)(VAR, UNASSIGNED)

The final research project that comprises REN R 912 is a final capping exercise for the degrees of MAg and MF. Its practical and professional focus should integrate the core areas of study in the program. The successful completion of the project entails (1) a research topic approved by the supervisor; (2) the presentation of a draft research proposal; and (3) the presentation of the research as a written document to the supervisor. The project may take the form of any of the following: (1) a formal analysis of management practice, organizational processes or policy; (2) a formative or summative evaluation of a research project or program; (3) a case study, using secondary documents, survey data, or interviews; or (4) replication of a previous study, with either the introduction of a new variable or an analysis in a changed context.

★ 6 (fi 24)(VAR, UNASSIGNED)

The final research project that comprises REN R 912 is a final capping exercise for the degrees of MAg and MF. Its practical and professional focus should integrate the core areas of study in the program. The successful completion of the project entails (1) a research topic approved by the supervisor; (2) the presentation of a draft research proposal; and (3) the presentation of the research as a written document to the supervisor. The project may take the form of any of the following: (1) a formal analysis of management practice, organizational processes or policy; (2) a formative or summative evaluation of a research project or program; (3) a case study, using secondary documents, survey data, or interviews; or (4) replication of a previous study, with either the introduction of a new variable or an analysis in a changed context.

★ 6 (fi 24)(VAR, UNASSIGNED)

The final research project that comprises REN R 912 is a final capping exercise for the degrees of MAg and MF. Its practical and professional focus should integrate the core areas of study in the program. The successful completion of the project entails (1) a research topic approved by the supervisor; (2) the presentation of a draft research proposal; and (3) the presentation of the research as a written document to the supervisor. The project may take the form of any of the following: (1) a formal analysis of management practice, organizational processes or policy; (2) a formative or summative evaluation of a research project or program; (3) a case study, using secondary documents, survey data, or interviews; or (4) replication of a previous study, with either the introduction of a new variable or an analysis in a changed context.