INT D - Interdisciplinary Undergraduate & Graduate Courses

Offered By:
Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences
Faculty of Arts
Faculty of Business
Faculty of Education
Faculty of Extension
Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry
Faculty of Nursing
Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation
Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine
Faculty of Science
School of Public Health
Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research

Below are the courses available from the INT D code. Select a course to view the available classes, additional class notes, and class times.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Students will engage with impactful leaders, from many backgrounds, who have made a positive contribution to the world. By the end of the course, students will be able to visualize their potential for leadership growth and be inspired to continue their journey to take action. Open to all students.

★ 3 (fi VAR)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. [Faculty of Arts]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Focuses on the skills needed to communicate effectively in academic settings through a variety of readings, exercises, tasks and workshops. Students in this course will work to develop writing, speaking, listening, and reading skills in the context of academia-specific topics. Note: Restricted to students in the Fresh Start Program who have been recommended by the Director of Fresh Start. Sections offered at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations sections of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course uses various media genres to explore both dominant understandings of leadership as well as shifts in those understandings. Exploring film, stage, television, and video games, we will analyze the way that popular culture is both informed by, and informs, popular theories and public understanding of leadership. Situating content within its historical and sociopolitical context, we will analyze how various texts inform public understandings of what a leader looks like, how they should act, and what is at stake in following them. [Faculty of Arts]

★ 3 (fi VAR)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. [Faculty of Science]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)
There is no available course description.
★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course is offered in response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action, and is the beginning step to culturally safe interaction and practice. Focus is on introducing students to a variety of historical realities and contemporary issues relevant to Indigenous health in Canada. Students will examine issues and contributions facing settler relations from a historical, contemporary and critical perspective, with a focus on health and well-being. Note: Priority will be given to students in health science programs where this is a required course. Not to be taken if credit received for NURS 222.

★ 3 (fi VAR)(VAR, VARIABLE)

May require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. [Faculty of Arts]

★ 1.5 (fi VAR)(VAR, VARIABLE)

May require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. [Faculty of Arts]

★ 3 (fi VAR)(VAR, VARIABLE)

May require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar. Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. [Faculty of Arts]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

A dynamic introduction to interdisciplinary study and to the range of challenges facing society today. Insights of different disciplines in the Faculties of Arts and Science will be brought to bear by instructors in understanding and exploring several core problems and case studies of broad societal significance. The course will incorporate seminar-style discussion, collaborative work, and engaged learning projects. Prerequisite: At least *18 at the 100 level in the Faculty of Arts and/or the Faculty of Science. (This course is jointly offered by the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Science). [Faculty of Science]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

An overview of leadership models, focusing on the scientific study of leadership, and on leadership as a form of engaged citizenship. Using evidence-based approaches to leadership development and practice, as well as followership perspectives. Prerequisite: At least *18 at the 100-level in the Faculty of Arts and/or the Faculty of Science. (This course is jointly offered by the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Science.) [Faculty of Arts]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This interdisciplinary survey course provides an in-depth exploration of grieving and loss. No one is immune to this experience and given the pandemic everyone is experiencing some sort of loss. A grief reaction is based on many factors such as culture, age, gender, previous losses, being an immigrant etc. Students will also learn numerous strategies to help them manage their grieving.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This interdisciplinary survey course provides an in-depth exploration of resilience and what it means to individuals and society in general. Resilience is viewed as an essential component of society to enhance the quality of life for all. The course has a number of experiential components to ensure students not only know what resilience is but to feel it in their bodies. No prerequisite is required.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Loneliness is a growing issue in our society due to factors such as social and demographic changes, technology, isolation, and stigma. The course content will include theories of loneliness and parallel concepts such as social isolation, depression and withdrawal. Strategies will be discussed to deepen understanding about the implications of being lonely.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

The purpose of this interdisciplinary course is to examine why and how to pursue joy and happiness in life. Learners examine the importance of joy, happiness and finding a good life through a positive psychology lens. Learners examine notable theory and scientific research related to joy and happiness and learn and apply active strategies to improve their own joy and happiness.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This is a survey course on what is cannabis, how and why it is used. Topics will include: history, harm reduction, benefits, regulation, medical and recreational uses, health effects and risks, treatment options, research evidence, ethics and business practices. Implications of legalization will be discussed. Open to all undergraduate students.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

An interdisciplinary study of the physical and human dimensions of mountain environments. Content includes the physical (glaciers, climate, geology, etc.), biological (flora, fauna, ecology, etc.), physiological (human bodies at altitude, performance, sport, etc.), and cultural (societies, literature's, histories, etc.) dimensions of these unique regions, as well as a critical analysis of the processes of change and influence shaping local and regional mountain environments around the globe, past and present. (Offered jointly by the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation and the Faculty of Science) [Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

An introduction to the scholarly literature on the theory and practice of leadership. Course content draws on humanities and social science disciplines to analyze effective leadership. The course uses experiential learning to explore topics such as: emotional intelligence, cognitive bias, power and privilege, communication, teamwork, and adaptive leadership. Prerequisite: students must have a minimum of *30 or consent of the department. [Faculty of Arts]

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Economic issues in international agriculture including the world food problem; the role of agriculture in development; agricultural and food trade; biotechnology and associated environmental and globalization issues. Prerequisite: ECON 101 or 102. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 375. (Offered jointly by the Departments of Economics and Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology (REES)). [REES]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

This course will explore complex local and global wicked problems that require interdisciplinary leadership solutions. Students will explore novel, ecological approaches to leadership to develop innovation strategies that contribute toward solving these complex problems. Pre- or corequisite: INT D 301. Counts toward the Certificate in Interdisciplinary Leadership Studies offered by the School of Business in collaboration with the Peter Lougheed Leadership College. [Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences]

★ 3 (fi 6)(SPR/SUM, 3-0-0)

Language use and attitudes about language within the socio-cultural context of Canadian Indigenous communities. Addresses issues surrounding the health and survivability of Indigenous languages in different types of family, community, and school contexts. Special attention given to Indigenous language advocacy at the family, band, national, and international levels. Training in effective grant-writing techniques included. Restricted to CILLDI program students. (Offered jointly by the following faculties: Arts; Education; and Native Studies.) Prerequisite: LING 101 or LING 111. [Linguistics]

★ 3 (fi 6)(SPR/SUM, 3-0-0)

Provides Canadian Indigenous language speakers with the technical skills needed to digitally archive their languages in a database or on the web with text, sound, images, and video. These digital resources can be incorporated into interactive multimedia resources for access by community-based learners and second-language teachers. Restricted to CILLDI program students. (Offered jointly by the following faculties: Arts; Education; and Native Studies.) Prerequisite: LING 101 or LING 111. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in LING 399 (Techniques for Endangered Language Documentation) or NS 380 (Technologies for Endangered Language Documentation). [Linguistics]

★ 3 (fi VAR)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. Sections offered at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations sections of the Calendar. [Faculty of Arts]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

The key issues and challenges of regional planning such as how regional planning will be examined including: historical development of regionalism in Canada and Alberta, how regionalism has helped and hindered the development of communities, nationally, provincially, locally. Students will gain experience in reviewing and critiquing concepts and theories that are characteristic of regionalism. Sections offered at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations sections of the Calendar. Open to students in the Undergraduate Program in Planning or Consent of the Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

The characteristics of rural environments that relate to current planning challenges and land use pressures will be examined. Topics such as: changing agricultural practices, rural health issues, planning for rural sustainability and the role of legislation at provincial, regional and intermunicipal levels will be discussed. Many case examples will be used throughout the course. Sections offered at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations sections of the Calendar. Open to students in the Undergraduate Program in Planning or consent of the Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Team-based exploration of the formal elements of games including tabletop games, sports, live-action games, and computer games. Prerequisite: CMPUT 250 or consent of the Program. [Faculty of Arts, Media and Technology Studies]

★ 3 (fi 6)(SPR/SUM, 9-3S-4 3W)

This course provides a cross-cultural interprofessional learning experience that explores the impact of differences in diet, lifestyle, and food security on patient health and practice. The students also develop an understanding of how education and citizenship influence professional identity and practice. The interdisciplinary course is taught in Italy. Available to students in the Faculties of Nursing, Pharmacy, ALES (Nutrition), and Kinesiology, Sports and Recreation. Students who have completed second year or third year of their respective programs with a minimum GPA of 2.7 in the Fall term prior to the course, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. Prerequisite: Department consent. Sections offered at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations sections of the Calendar. (Offered jointly by the Faculty of Nursing and the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.)

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

Mountain Studies is an interdisciplinary field of scholarship emphasizing the interconnections between the cultural and physical dimensions of mountain environments. This senior-level course focuses on the complex processes of change that shaped, and continue to shape, Canada's Western Cordillera, with a specific emphasis on the Rocky, Columbia, and Saint Elias mountains. Melding practice and theory, this lecture-based course draws on scholarship from the across the humanities (history, cultural studies, and literature) and the Earth sciences (geology, glaciology, and meteorology) in order to place on the view the complex historical period of colonial settlement in these mountains, and the intertwining of state and commercial power, science, sport and leisure practices that put these landscapes on the map, literally and figuratively. This course will provide unique educational and training experience for senior undergraduate students interested in mountain places, peoples, and practices. Prerequisite: INT D 280; or EAS 100 or EAS 201; or Consent of the Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

A study of how society affects politics and politics affects society. Discussion of the political consequences of economic developments, ideological debates, class conflicts, social movements, elites, gender, nationalisms and state structures. Focus on Canada from a comparative perspective. Prerequisite: POL S 101 or one of SOC 100, 202 or 300. (Offered jointly by the Departments of Political Science and Sociology.) [Political Science]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Prerequisite: SOC 225. Note: Primarily for BA (Criminology) students. [Sociology]

★ 1 (fi 2)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

This course provides foundational knowledge, skills and experience in interprofessional health care competencies, including collaborative teamwork development. (Priority will be given to students in health science programs where this is a required course.) (Offered jointly by the following faculties: Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences; Medicine and Dentistry; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation; and Rehabilitation Medicine.) [Health Sciences Council].

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course aims to provide students the opportunity to engage with current literature and experts, and to extend their own research skills as they strive to understand how global citizenship might frame the roles of individuals and communities with which they will interact in increasingly diverse social, economic, and political contexts that are not restricted by geographical or social boundaries. This course will examine select theories and case studies that focus on the constructions of global citizenship, and how citizenship is (has been) lived, denied, recreated and/or re-imagined. [Educational Policy Studies]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

Investigation of the nature and use of evidence and models of scientific inquiry as they apply to theory and research in leadership. Students will work in teams to conduct an interdisciplinary leadership project that involves designing an innovative solution to a collectively identified problem. Prerequisite: INT D 301. Counts toward the Certificate in Interdisciplinary Leadership Studies offered by the Peter Lougheed Leadership College. [Faculty of Science]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

Using experiential learning to build practical leadership skills that generalize across organizational settings, and ethical decision making under constraints (stress, time, financial). Leading, understanding, influencing, communicating and motivating others in organizations and teams. Topics may include vision, mission, values, leading change, managing teams, organizational culture management (recruiting, socializing, rewarding), and working with boards. Prerequisite: INT D 301. Counts toward the Certificate in Interdisciplinary Leadership Studies offered by the School of Business in collaboration with the Peter Lougheed Leadership College. [Faculty of Business].

★ 0.5 (fi VAR)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Application of interprofessional competencies within a specific health care context. Content topics vary from year to year. Topics announced prior to registration period. The student's transcript carries title descriptive of content. May be repeated. Prerequisite or corequisite: INT D 403, or equivalent introductory interprofessional health education course, or approval of Health Sciences Education and Research Commons, Health Sciences Council. (Offered jointly by the following faculties: Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences; Medicine and Dentistry; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation; and Rehabilitation Medicine.) [Health Sciences Council].

★ 0.25 (fi VAR)(TWO TERM, VARIABLE)

Application of interprofessional competencies within a specific health care context. Content topics vary from year to year. Topics announced prior to registration period. The student's transcript carries title descriptive of content. May be repeated. Prerequisite or corequisite: INT D 403, or equivalent introductory interprofessional health education course, or approval of Health Sciences Education and Research Commons, Health Sciences Council. (Offered jointly by the following faculties: Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences; Medicine and Dentistry; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation; and Rehabilitation Medicine.) [Health Sciences Council].

★ 0.5 (fi VAR)(TWO TERM, VARIABLE)

Application of interprofessional competencies within a specific health care context. Content topics vary from year to year. Topics announced prior to registration period. The student's transcript carries title descriptive of content. May be repeated. Prerequisite or corequisite: INT D 403, or equivalent introductory interprofessional health education course, or approval of Health Sciences Education and Research Commons, Health Sciences Council. (Offered jointly by the following faculties: Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences; Medicine and Dentistry; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation; and Rehabilitation Medicine.) [Health Sciences Council].

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course will provide opportunities for students to develop a deeper, more situated, understanding of the guiding principles that underpin equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) in the global context. In line with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the students will recognize the key issues related to EDI in global health including global citizenship, a sense of social justice; environmental, social, economic and political global challenges; agency; intersectionality (ethnicity, gender, patriarchy, power relationships) and an appreciation for cultural diversity. Prerequisites: All courses in the program except NURS 422, NURS 425 and NURS 485. Corequisites NURS 422 and 425, SC INF 425 and PHILE 386.

★ 3 (fi VAR)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. [Faculty of Arts, Office of Interdisciplinary Studies]

★ 1.5 (fi VAR)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. [Faculty of Arts, Office of Interdisciplinary Studies]

★ 3 (fi VAR)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. [Faculty of Arts, Office of Interdisciplinary Studies]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

A theoretical and experiential investigation of the forms and history of Ukrainian dance. Course content is focused on the relationships of this dance to Ukrainian as well as Canadian culture, with consideration to its artistic and educational aspects. Offered jointly by the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation and the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies. [Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies] May be taken as a Faculty of Arts course or as a Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation course.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 1-1S-3)

Supervised participation in a peer mentorship practicum, coupled with classroom instruction and seminars. In this course, students will research best practices for acting as a peer mentor in class, participate in a peer mentorship practicum for 3 hours per week within the Faculty of Science, and meet in seminars in supervised groups to discuss issues within their practicum experiences. Normally taken after completion of a minimum of 60 units of course weight in a program in either Faculty. Prerequisite: INT D 241 and GPA of 2.3 or higher and consent of the student's Faculty. Enrollment is by consent of the Faculty of Science and requires a formal application. Application does not guarantee a Peer Mentorship in the Arts and Sciences class position. (This course is jointly offered by the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Science). [Faculty of Science]

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, 0-1S-3)

Mentored and peer-mentored individual leadership practicum. In this course students will choose a personal leadership opportunity that involves curricular, extra-curricular, or off-campus leadership. Students will meet once a week in a guided seminar format. Prerequisite: INT D 241. (This course is jointly offered by the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Science.) [Faculty of Arts]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Team-based development of a complete game to be released on any computing platform. Prerequisite: CMPUT 250. [Faculty of Arts, Media and Technology Studies]

★ 4 (fi 8)(SPR/SUM, 78 HOURS)

This is an inter-professional course with an international and intercultural component co-taught with faculty from Fudan University, and taught at Fudan University in Shanghai, China. Health science students from the University of Alberta and partner Canadian Universities and students from Fudan University will study the similarities and differences in health care delivery, the cultural approaches to health, and roles in global health in Canada and China. The course combines didactic presentations, small group work, student presentations, visits to health agencies in Shanghai and a hospital placement. Please contact the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences for additional information. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Sections offered at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations sections of the Calendar. (Offered jointly by the following faculties: Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry.)

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

An introduction to conceptual and methodological foundations of community-based participatory research in the health and social sciences.

★ 1 (fi 2)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

This course provides foundational knowledge, skills and experience in interprofessional health care competencies, including collaborative teamwork development. (Priority will be given to students in health science programs where this is a required course.) (Offered jointly by the following faculties: Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences; Medicine and Dentistry; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation; and Rehabilitation Medicine.) [Health Sciences Council].

★ 0.5 (fi VAR)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Application of interprofessional competencies within a specific health care context. Content topics vary from year to year. Topics announced prior to registration period. The student's transcript carries title descriptive of content. May be repeated Prerequisite or corequisite: INT D 403, INT D 503, or equivalent introductory interprofessional health education course, or approval of Health Sciences Education and Research Commons, Health Sciences Council. (Offered jointly by the following faculties: Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences; Medicine and Dentistry; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation; and Rehabilitation Medicine.) [Health Sciences Council].

★ 0.25 (fi VAR)(TWO TERM, VARIABLE)

Application of interprofessional competencies within a specific health care context. Content topics vary from year to year. Topics announced prior to registration period. The student's transcript carries title descriptive of content. May be repeated Prerequisite or corequisite: INT D 403, INT D 503, or equivalent introductory interprofessional health education course, or approval of Health Sciences Education and Research Commons, Health Sciences Council. (Offered jointly by the following faculties: Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences; Medicine and Dentistry; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation; and Rehabilitation Medicine.) [Health Sciences Council].

★ 0.5 (fi VAR)(TWO TERM, VARIABLE)

Application of interprofessional competencies within a specific health care context. Content topics vary from year to year. Topics announced prior to registration period. The student's transcript carries title descriptive of content. May be repeated Prerequisite or corequisite: INT D 403, INT D 503, or equivalent introductory interprofessional health education course, or approval of Health Sciences Education and Research Commons, Health Sciences Council. (Offered jointly by the following faculties: Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences; Medicine and Dentistry; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation; and Rehabilitation Medicine.) [Health Sciences Council].

★ 1.5 (fi VAR)(VAR, UNASSIGNED)

For students in Combined Honors programs. Permission of both Departments and the Faculty of Arts, Undergraduate Services office is required. Registration in this class may require attendance and participation in specific program seminars. Students must apply to the Faculty office by August 1st to be considered for registration in this course. [Faculty of Arts, Undergraduate Student Services]

★ 3 (fi VAR)(VAR, UNASSIGNED)

For students in Combined Honors programs. Permission of both Departments and the Faculty of Arts, Undergraduate Services office is required. Registration in this class may require attendance and participation in specific program seminars. Students must apply to the Faculty office by August 1st to be considered for registration in this course. [Faculty of Arts, Undergraduate Student Services]

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Integrated exploration of concepts and research methods pertaining to gastrointestinal physiology, gastrointestinal disorders, and the role of the commensal microbiota in health and disease of humans and animals. Tools to modify the function of the intestinal microflora for prevention or treatment of disease by administration of probiotic bacteria or by administration of prebiotics. Offered in odd-numbered years. Prerequisites: (*3 Microbiology or *3 Immunology) and consent of instructor. Offered jointly by the Departments of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science and Medicine. [Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science].

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

Faculty of Arts

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

This course covers the basics of qualitative research including theoretical underpinnings, main methods, sampling, data collection, analysis and proposal writing. It serves as a strong introduction to qualitative inquiry. This course is designed as a graduate seminar. While some classes will be structured, the intent is to learn from each other's experiences and their research examples. Credit will not be granted to students who have previously received credit for INT D 560 -Principles of Qualitative Inquiry.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, UNASSIGNED)

Students will participate in a supervised field experience and demonstrate the integration of concepts, principles and approaches learned in INT D 500 Introduction to Community-Based Research and evaluation. Students will prepare a knowledge-sharing activity appropriate to the field experience setting. Normally students will be expected to complete all of their CBRE Graduate Certificate course requirements prior to enrolling in INT D 541. Open to students in the CBRE Graduate Embedded Certificate only.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Economic analysis of renewable resource and environmental issues. Renewable resource theory with applications to the fishery, forestry, soils and wildlife. Economic analysis of environmental protection and policy. Topics in applied benefit-cost analysis including the valuation of non-market goods and services. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. AREC 313 and 502 recommended. (Offered jointly by the Departments of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology and Economics.) [Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology].

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

An interdisciplinary course exploring selected topics in bioethics. Includes examination of ethical theories and principles within the context of clinical practice (nursing, medicine, rehabilitation medicine, dentistry, pharmacy) and learning experiences to improve moral reasoning and ethical decision making. Prerequisite: consent of Instructors. [Faculty of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, John Dossetor Health Ethics Centre]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 39 HOURS)

Qualitative research is increasingly used to describe and understand a wide range of social phenomena, gain input from stakeholders, develop tools (e.g., questionnaires), and further explain quantitative findings. The overarching objective of the course is to prepare graduate students for designing, conducting, reporting, and critically appraising qualitative research related to health and health education. Issues that will be discussed include ontological and epistemological underpinnings of qualitative research, phases of a qualitative research project, methodological rigor, report writing, and knowledge translation.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

As an element of whole person health assessment, spiritual assessment is of interest to a broad spectrum of health as well as ministry professionals. Emphasis is placed on consideration of theories and skills needed for the practice of spiritual assessment. The course provides a context for interdisciplinary reflection on understandings of the human person, health, health promotion, spirituality, spiritual needs, and spiritual care. Students are invited to explore their own spirituality and various approaches to assessing the spiritual based on a variety of definitions and understandings of spirituality. Specific models and tools for spiritual assessment will be considered, two will be looked at in depth, and students will have opportunities to bring theory as well as experience together in both group and individual exercises of spiritual assessment rooted in their ministry/health practice.

★ 3 (fi 6)(FIRST, 3-0-0)

Transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary lecture series on maternal-fetal-newborn health are presented; Defining and navigating the challenges of conducting Interdisciplinary research, defining conceptual frameworks, research resources, research approaches to MFN health, research grant funding structures and grant review, communicating outside of academia, and a variety of maternal-fetal-newborn transdisciplinary health topics; genetics, neuroscience, pharmacology, physiology, nursing, health population outcomes. Four projects involving transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary composition related to the lecture series will be required.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

An interdisciplinary course for graduate students who are enrolled in the MatCH Scholarship Program to gain experience in quantitative or qualitative biomedical and clinical research settings. The course will involve three rotations, of 4 to 6 weeks each, in different laboratory settings within the Departments of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology or Medical Genetics. Students will also attend the general seminar series of each Department once per month, a total of three per month. Students will be graded (CR/NC) based on participation and written assignments based on each rotation. Enrollment must be approved by course coordinators.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

The objective of this course is to provide students with knowledge, methodological skills, and guidance through all steps of conducting a variety of systematic literature reviews. Topics include developing a research question, literature searching, managing references, selecting studies, quality assessment, data extraction, synthesizing evidence, heterogeneity, and interpretation of evidence. Readings and seminar discussions focus on critical judgment factors that reviewers must make to enhance rigor in their review. This course addresses reviews of quantitative and qualitative. It provides a foundation for those interested in conducting intensive qualitative or quantitative reviews. Prerequisites: A graduate course in Statistics and a graduate course in Research Design, and permission of the instructor.

★ 1 (fi VAR)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

Selected topics in nursing at the doctoral level.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

Applied economic modeling of resource utilization and environmental issues with a focus in forestry and agriculture. Topics may include current Canadian and international issues in the area of environmental valuation, energy, climate change, biodiversity and conservation as related to Forestry and Agriculture. Prerequisite: AREC 365; AREC 313 and ECON 281 recommended. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 465 and INT D 665. Available only to students in MBA/MAg, MBA/MF, MBA in Natural Resource and Energy Programs, or by consent of the instructor. [Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology]

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

Examines the ethical issues which arise in research involving human subjects. Research methods studied may include clinical trials, surveys, secondary analysis of stored data, and the observation of public behavior. Problems encountered in studying particular populations, such as children or persons with dementia, will also be studied. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. [Faculty of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, John Dossetor Health Ethics Centre].

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

This course examines the scientific, theoretical, and historical underpinnings of the distinct but related fields of knowledge utilization, knowledge translation and innovation diffusion. Attention is given to contemporary manifestations in Canadian society such as evidence-based/evidence-informed decision-making, and in health care such as evidence-based medicine, and evidence-based practice. Particular attention will be given to the challenges of knowledge use in complex organizations and in the use of strategies to increase the use of knowledge, primarily although not exclusively the use of scientific knowledge. The course will focus on the central conceptual and methodological challenges in the field.

★ 0 (fi 0)(EITH/SP/SU, 6 HOURS)

This 6-hour Ethics and Academic Citizenship course provides foundational knowledge of ethical principles and relevant university policies, including: academic integrity, plagiarism, introduction to research ethics, conflict of interest, and workplace ethics and self-care. Master's students who have already completed the INT D 710 Ethics and Academic Citizenship course and pursue a second master's degree are not required to repeat the course.

★ 0 (fi 0)(EITH/SP/SU, 2 HOURS)

This 2-hour course provides advanced treatment of ethical principles, including: research and scholarship, intellectual property, academic citizenship, and ethical principles in university teaching. While this advanced course is only required for all Doctoral students, it is open to any graduate students who have already completed the INT D 710 Ethics and Academic Citizenship course, and who wish to participate in the advanced modules. Prerequisite: INT D 710.