SPH - School of Public Health

Offered By:
School of Public Health

Below are the courses available from the SPH code. Select a course to view the available classes, additional class notes, and class times.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course will introduce you to fundamental knowledge and concepts related to public health. Starting with the history and evolution of the discipline of public health, onto how the health of populations is protected and measured, you will gain a better appreciation of the importance of the social determinants of health and how health inequities, chronic and communicable diseases, injuries and the environment can impact health are explored. Additional topics include how promotion of healthy communities can be achieved through knowledge translation and advocacy. If you are interested in health then this course will serve as an excellent primer to your future studies in any health field. Topics are covered using a mix of lecture, discussion and interactive case study evaluation.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Students taking this course will develop an understanding of the food safety system in Canada from the perspective of public health, including the complex regulatory and industry controls, epidemiology and surveillance for foodborne illness, and emergency outbreak investigation and response to detection of a foodborne hazard. The course includes a hands on simulation of a foodborne illness outbreak where students will be put into an Incident Command System (ICS) to manage the outbreak and develop these critical skills for outbreak investigation. Students taking this course will have the opportunity to obtain their ICS 100 certification level. Credit will only be given for one of SPH 415 or SPH 515.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

One Health is an emerging paradigm in public and veterinary health which recognizes that human, animal and environmental health are interlinked. The course will address food and water safety, the increase in prevalence of antibiotic resistant organisms, emerging infectious zoonotic diseases, environmental protection and environmental sustainability, emphasizing the interaction of these diverse yet interconnected disciplines in protecting the health of populations. Graduate students may not register for credit (see SPH 516). Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 416, 516 or SPH 416, 516. Prerequisite: *3 MICRB or PHYSL.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-1)

Basic biostatistical concepts and methods used in health science research including; the role of biostatistics in research including ethics-related issues and data management; exploratory data analysis and data presentation by tabulations and graphics; estimation and comparisons of means, proportions, rates; introduction to linear regression analysis; brief overview of logistic regression; and non-parametric methods. Credit will only be given for one of SPH 431, SPH 531, or SPH 519. Prerequisite: Introductory statistics course or consent of Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This is a specialization course focused on developing and deepening participants' understanding of critical policy issues affecting health and health services in a comparative perspective. The course will primarily review health policy in the context of Canadian populations and systems. This course also introduces students to the field of health policy analysis and teaches relevant concepts and methods that will provide students with basic skills required to conduct health policy research for the purposes of informing or explaining health policy development, to be critical consumers of health policy research and media coverage of health policy issues.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Students will be expected to apply knowledge of selected social determinants of health to multi-level interventions to improve health of individuals, communities, and populations. The course takes an ecological approach to the analysis of health needs and the design of public health actions. Students will apply key social science theories to the analysis of social determinants of health. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 12)(TWO TERM, 0-3S-0)

A critical review of research methods and intervention strategies in health promotion. A broad range of research, review, and evaluation strategies will be presented including both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Emphasis is on developing a critical understanding of the application of different research strategies to answer specific health promotion questions. Students will be expected to develop and present their thesis proposal or significant research project within this course. Pre or corequisite: SPH 501 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 502 and SPH 502.

★ 3 (fi 12)(TWO TERM, 0-3S-0)

A critical review of research methods and intervention strategies in health promotion. A broad range of research, review, and evaluation strategies will be presented including both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Emphasis is on developing a critical understanding of the application of different research strategies to answer specific health promotion questions. Students will be expected to develop and present their thesis proposal or significant research project within this course. Pre or corequisite: SPH 501 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 502 and SPH 502.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Foundations of basic and applied research in health promotion. Consideration is given to a broad range of research strategies including qualitative and quantitative methods. Emphasis is on a critical understanding of why, when, and how to apply different research strategies to answer specific health promotion questions. Pre or corequisite: SPH 501. Students with insufficient background in undergraduate statistics will be required to complete a qualifying course in this area. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 503 and SPH 503.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the basic concepts, principles, facts and theories which relate to health program planning and program evaluation. Emphasis is on understanding the interface between and among planning principles, evaluation processes and organizational structures. The course also stresses the importance of analytical and communication skills as they apply to these processes. Prerequisites: SPH 501. Not to be taken by students with credit in INT D 504. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 504 and SPH 504.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course provides an overview of the various disciplines making up and impacting on public health. Discussions will cover the Canadian health care system, infectious and chronic disease epidemiology and control, environmental health, occupational health, health care evaluation, disease prevention, health promotion, and disease and exposure assessment. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 505 and SPH 505.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Provides an understanding of the biology of human health and disease as it affects public health. Normal biochemistry, physiology and immunology of healthy humans. Exploration of mechanisms responsible for genetic, nutritional, infectious, toxic and chronic diseases and their effects on human populations. Factors affecting human health and disease during stages of human development including infancy, youth, reproduction, pregnancy and aging. Examine the basis for current health promotion, disease prevention and control strategies. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 506 and SPH 506.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

This course is designed to prepare students to understand, and apply appropriately, concepts related to health inequities; and to critically assess research in this area. The course will have a core section for all students, with two options: Addressing Health Inequities (designed for Public Health practitioners), and Researching Health Inequities (appropriate for students in research degree programs). Prerequisite: SPH 501, 505, or 604. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 508 and SPH 508.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

In this course, learners apply a health promotion lens to examining health issues in a low-resource environment, and possibilities for action toward positive, sustainable change. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

In this course, learners focus on people taking collective action to influence change. Comprehensive strategies for promoting health are examined and analyzed by example, framed by empowerment education, creating supportive environments, strengthening community action and advocating for healthy policies. Learners explore questions and challenges in applying health promotion principles, concepts and theories to practice at the community level. The value of democratic approaches to decision-making is an underlying premise for this course. Pre or corequisite: SPH 501. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 510 and SPH 510. Credit will be granted for only one of SPH 510 or NURS 531. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Principles and practice of monitoring exposure to environmental contaminants, external and internal dose. Biomarkers for environmental contaminant dose estimation. Environmental and biological sampling. Routes of exposure, absorption, and distribution. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 511 and SPH 511.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Concepts of risk to health and environment, assessment, management and communication of risk, hazard identification, links to exposure assessment, toxicology and epidemiology, dose response assessment, risk characterization, regulatory and policy science. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 512 and SPH 512.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Introduces environmental health issues and scientific understanding of their causes in developed and developing countries. Examines the role of environmental factors (biological, chemical, and physical) and its importance in relation to other factors that affect health of a community. Provides case studies of how environmental factors are dealt with in practice; including methods and approaches for assessment, prevention, and control. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Students taking this course will develop an understanding of the food safety system in Canada from the perspective of public health, including the complex regulatory and industry controls, epidemiology and surveillance for foodborne illness, and emergency outbreak investigation and response to detection of a foodborne hazard. The course includes a hands on simulation of a foodborne illness outbreak where students will be put into an Incident Command System (ICS) to manage the outbreak and develop these critical skills for outbreak investigation. Students taking this course will have the opportunity to obtain their ICS 100 certification level. Credit will only be given for one of SPH 415 or SPH 515.

★ 3 (fi 6)(SECOND, 3-0-0)

One Health is an emerging paradigm in public and veterinary health which recognizes that human, animal and environmental health are interlinked. The course will address food and water safety, the increase in prevalence of antibiotic resistant organisms, emerging infectious zoonotic diseases, environmental protection and environmental sustainability, emphasizing the interaction of these diverse yet interconnected disciplines in protecting the health of populations. Lectures are the same as for SPH 416, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 516 and SPH 516. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 416, 516 or SPH 416, 516. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

An analysis of the principles of intervention at individual, community, organization and policy development levels. An overview of the strategies used in the practice of health promotion/evaluation and their application in a variety of health promotion settings (e.g., schools, the workplace, community and health centres). Prerequisite: SPH 501. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 505 and SPH 517. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

A critical, interdisciplinary review of psychosocial health. Theoretical and methodological implications from a variety of disciplinary perspectives are considered. Prerequisite: SPH 501 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 508 and SPH 518. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-1)

An introduction to elementary biostatistical methods used to analyze epidemiologic data. Topics will include analysis of 2 x 2 tables, nonparametric methods, linear regression, analysis of variance, direct and indirect standardization, and analysis of censored data. Prerequisite: Introductory statistics course or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 598 and SPH 519.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of selected occupational and environmental diseases. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 520 and SPH 520.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to occupational hygiene theory, principles, and practice. It covers the recognition, evaluation, and control of common occupational health hazards including chemicals, biological agents, physical agents, and ergonomic issues. The course is not designed to prepare hygienists for practice. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 521 and SPH 521.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course is geared to health care professionals who need to understand the basic principles of toxicology, to appreciate the physiological and/or biochemical mechanisms underlying target organ toxicity, and to able to make initial qualitative risk assessments on the potential toxicity of agents. It will emphasize toxins in the work and home environment. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 522 and SPH 522.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the exciting world of public health advocacy and reflect the realities health policy in Canada today. It is expected that the class will become actively engaged in one of several group projects to develop an advocacy campaign. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 504 and SPH 523.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Nutrition is a major public health issue. Under-nutrition, malnutrition and over-nutrition all affect the health of individuals and mortality in developing countries, malnutrition to various nutrition related diseases and over-nutrition to obesity and numerous chronic diseases globally. The discipline of Public Health Nutrition focuses on the promotion of good health through nutrition and the primary prevention of nutrition related illness in the population. This course in Public Health Nutrition provides a broad knowledge base on causes and public health consequences of under-, mal- and over-nutrition, and address issues related to nutritional research methods, nutritional assessment methods, nutritional intervention strategies, and nutrition policies.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Providing students with an understanding of the principles of risk: benefit evaluations related to the metabolic consequences of exposure to food borne chemicals and therapeutic agents, and to safety concerns about foods. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 427, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of SPH 527, AFNS 527 or NU FS 427. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This graduate course is grounded in an ecological framework that explores three major components: health, community and development. An ecological framework allows us to explore these things in an interconnected manner. Health, defined from a broad social determinants of health view and both the principles and practice of community development will be examined from a theoretical and practical perspective. The phenomenon of 'development' will be critically analyzed. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to: how the field of public health has evolved, views of health and wellness, determinants of health, social justice and health inequities, systems thinking, core public health functions, community-based strategies and interventions to improve public health, intercultural competence, Indigenous ways of knowing, and the role of evidence in public health planning and evaluation. The course uses a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to respond to a specific public health crisis in real time. PBL is based on the complex problems encountered in the real world as a stimulus for learning and for integrating and organizing learned information and concepts in public health in ways that will ensure recall and application to future public health problems. The course also introduces Canadian experiences related to Indigenous history, treaties, and Indigenous values and creates an environment where students can reflect on their position as individual public health practitioners and their collective role in advancing reconciliation in public health. SPH 530 is the required first course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to: how the field of public health has evolved, views of health and wellness, determinants of health, social justice and health inequities, systems thinking, core public health functions, community-based strategies and interventions to improve public health, intercultural competence, Indigenous ways of knowing, and the role of evidence in public health planning and evaluation. The course uses a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to respond to a specific public health crisis in real time. PBL is based on the complex problems encountered in the real world as a stimulus for learning and for integrating and organizing learned information and concepts in public health in ways that will ensure recall and application to future public health problems. The course also introduces Canadian experiences related to Indigenous history, treaties, and Indigenous values and creates an environment where students can reflect on their position as individual public health practitioners and their collective role in advancing reconciliation in public health. SPH 530 is the required first course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to: how the field of public health has evolved, views of health and wellness, determinants of health, social justice and health inequities, systems thinking, core public health functions, community-based strategies and interventions to improve public health, intercultural competence, Indigenous ways of knowing, and the role of evidence in public health planning and evaluation. The course uses a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to respond to a specific public health crisis in real time. PBL is based on the complex problems encountered in the real world as a stimulus for learning and for integrating and organizing learned information and concepts in public health in ways that will ensure recall and application to future public health problems. The course also introduces Canadian experiences related to Indigenous history, treaties, and Indigenous values and creates an environment where students can reflect on their position as individual public health practitioners and their collective role in advancing reconciliation in public health. SPH 530 is the required first course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-1)

Basic biostatistical concepts and methods used in health science research including; the role of biostatistics in research including ethics-related issues and data management; exploratory data analysis and data presentation by tabulations and graphics; estimation and comparisons of means, proportions, rates; introduction to linear regression analysis; brief overview of logistic regression; and non-parametric methods. Credit will only be given for one of SPH 431, SPH 531, or SPH 519. Prerequisite: Introductory statistics course or consent of Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

Advanced principles, concepts, processes and strategies for the communication of risks to human health posed by potentially hazardous agents or situations. Topics include communication and risk communication theory, the risk communication process, and the role of risk communication as part of an integrated risk management strategy, as well as an in depth examination of empirical research methods and specific risk communication issues. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 516 and SPH 533.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

This is the first of two consecutive courses that provide an overview of evidence used by communities, governments, health systems, and academics to inform public health actions. This course covers practical contexts within which public health evidence is used, philosophical and disciplinary assumptions shaping views on what evidence is relevant for decision-making, and ethical and equity dimensions of evidence creation and use. Fundamental biostatistical, epidemiologic, and measurement concepts are introduced in the context of descriptive, analytic, and causal research questions, and study designs used to answer them. SPH 535 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisite: SPH 530. Corequisites: SPH 536, SPH 541, and SPH 562, or consent of instructor.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

This is the first of two consecutive courses that provide an overview of evidence used by communities, governments, health systems, and academics to inform public health actions. This course covers practical contexts within which public health evidence is used, philosophical and disciplinary assumptions shaping views on what evidence is relevant for decision-making, and ethical and equity dimensions of evidence creation and use. Fundamental biostatistical, epidemiologic, and measurement concepts are introduced in the context of descriptive, analytic, and causal research questions, and study designs used to answer them. SPH 535 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisite: SPH 530. Corequisites: SPH 536, SPH 541, and SPH 562, or consent of instructor.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

This is the first of two consecutive courses that provide an overview of evidence used by communities, governments, health systems, and academics to inform public health actions. This course covers practical contexts within which public health evidence is used, philosophical and disciplinary assumptions shaping views on what evidence is relevant for decision-making, and ethical and equity dimensions of evidence creation and use. Fundamental biostatistical, epidemiologic, and measurement concepts are introduced in the context of descriptive, analytic, and causal research questions, and study designs used to answer them. SPH 535 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisite: SPH 530. Corequisites: SPH 536, SPH 541, and SPH 562, or consent of instructor.

★ 2 (fi 4)(VAR, 3-0-0)

Our perceptions and interpretations of what is good for society are at the core of public health's mission but, as you can imagine, every individual has their own opinion about what is good. How do we motivate and engage people with such diverse attitudes and opinions in the dialogue that leads to public health action? Coupled with a deep dive into the philosophical underpinnings of meta-ethics, normative ethics, epistemology and ontology, this course helps students understand why public health is not as straightforward as one might expect. How different worldviews and ways of knowing shape concepts of ethics and values and, ultimately, understandings of what is good, are considered from normative, Indigenous, and other non-Western perspectives. This foundational work supports experiential learning opportunities where students are paired with organizations and professionals to gain insights into practices and experiences of engagement for public health action. SPH 536 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisite: SPH 530. Corequisites: SPH 562, SPH 535, or consent of instructor.

★ 1 (fi 4)(VAR, 3-0-0)

Our perceptions and interpretations of what is good for society are at the core of public health's mission but, as you can imagine, every individual has their own opinion about what is good. How do we motivate and engage people with such diverse attitudes and opinions in the dialogue that leads to public health action? Coupled with a deep dive into the philosophical underpinnings of meta-ethics, normative ethics, epistemology and ontology, this course helps students understand why public health is not as straightforward as one might expect. How different worldviews and ways of knowing shape concepts of ethics and values and, ultimately, understandings of what is good, are considered from normative, Indigenous, and other non-Western perspectives. This foundational work supports experiential learning opportunities where students are paired with organizations and professionals to gain insights into practices and experiences of engagement for public health action. SPH 536 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisite: SPH 530. Corequisites: SPH 562, SPH 535, or consent of instructor.

★ 1 (fi 4)(VAR, 3-0-0)

Our perceptions and interpretations of what is good for society are at the core of public health's mission but, as you can imagine, every individual has their own opinion about what is good. How do we motivate and engage people with such diverse attitudes and opinions in the dialogue that leads to public health action? Coupled with a deep dive into the philosophical underpinnings of meta-ethics, normative ethics, epistemology and ontology, this course helps students understand why public health is not as straightforward as one might expect. How different worldviews and ways of knowing shape concepts of ethics and values and, ultimately, understandings of what is good, are considered from normative, Indigenous, and other non-Western perspectives. This foundational work supports experiential learning opportunities where students are paired with organizations and professionals to gain insights into practices and experiences of engagement for public health action. SPH 536 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisite: SPH 530. Corequisites: SPH 562, SPH 535, or consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

This is the second of two consecutive courses that provide an overview of evidence used by communities, governments, health systems, and academics to inform public health actions. This course covers social science methods (surveys, analysis of qualitative evidence), sampling approaches, quality appraisal and synthesis of pre-existing evidence, and quantitative methods for identifying risk factors. Fundamental concepts used in program planning & evaluation, evidence transferability and scalability, and costs analysis are introduced. SPH 537 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 541, SPH 562, or consent of instructor. Corequisites: SPH 541B, and SPH 546, SPH 563 or consent of instructor.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

This is the second of two consecutive courses that provide an overview of evidence used by communities, governments, health systems, and academics to inform public health actions. This course covers social science methods (surveys, analysis of qualitative evidence), sampling approaches, quality appraisal and synthesis of pre-existing evidence, and quantitative methods for identifying risk factors. Fundamental concepts used in program planning & evaluation, evidence transferability and scalability, and costs analysis are introduced. SPH 537 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 541, SPH 562, or consent of instructor. Corequisites: SPH 541B, and SPH 546, SPH 563 or consent of instructor.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

This is the second of two consecutive courses that provide an overview of evidence used by communities, governments, health systems, and academics to inform public health actions. This course covers social science methods (surveys, analysis of qualitative evidence), sampling approaches, quality appraisal and synthesis of pre-existing evidence, and quantitative methods for identifying risk factors. Fundamental concepts used in program planning & evaluation, evidence transferability and scalability, and costs analysis are introduced. SPH 537 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 541, SPH 562, or consent of instructor. Corequisites: SPH 541B, and SPH 546, SPH 563 or consent of instructor.

★ 2 (fi 4)(VAR, 2-0-0)

Building on foundational concepts, knowledge, and skills introduced in pre and corequisite courses and continuing with problem-based learning, students work in teams to address challenging public health scenarios. The course emphasizes qualities and skills for effective team work essential in public health practice, including critical thinking, self-awareness, reflection and reflexivity, collaboration, and deliberation. Implications of normative, Indigenous and anti-oppressive approaches to effective teamwork are introduced to shape principles to guide effective practice. Students practice skills required for conceptualizing and assessing public health problems and planning interventions, including systems thinking, using evidence, assessing stakeholders and community members, anticipating and transforming conflict, applying ethical principles, and communicating effectively. SPH 541 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 536. Corequisites: SPH 535, SPH 537, SPH 562, SPH 563, or consent of instructor.

★ 1 (fi 4)(VAR, 2-0-0)

Building on foundational concepts, knowledge, and skills introduced in pre and corequisite courses and continuing with problem-based learning, students work in teams to address challenging public health scenarios. The course emphasizes qualities and skills for effective team work essential in public health practice, including critical thinking, self-awareness, reflection and reflexivity, collaboration, and deliberation. Implications of normative, Indigenous and anti-oppressive approaches to effective teamwork are introduced to shape principles to guide effective practice. Students practice skills required for conceptualizing and assessing public health problems and planning interventions, including systems thinking, using evidence, assessing stakeholders and community members, anticipating and transforming conflict, applying ethical principles, and communicating effectively. SPH 541 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 536. Corequisites: SPH 535, SPH 537, SPH 562, SPH 563, or consent of instructor.

★ 1 (fi 4)(VAR, 2-0-0)

Building on foundational concepts, knowledge, and skills introduced in pre and corequisite courses and continuing with problem-based learning, students work in teams to address challenging public health scenarios. The course emphasizes qualities and skills for effective team work essential in public health practice, including critical thinking, self-awareness, reflection and reflexivity, collaboration, and deliberation. Implications of normative, Indigenous and anti-oppressive approaches to effective teamwork are introduced to shape principles to guide effective practice. Students practice skills required for conceptualizing and assessing public health problems and planning interventions, including systems thinking, using evidence, assessing stakeholders and community members, anticipating and transforming conflict, applying ethical principles, and communicating effectively. SPH 541 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 536. Corequisites: SPH 535, SPH 537, SPH 562, SPH 563, or consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course will help students acquire and build conceptual tools and approaches to equip them for effective global health practice in low-income countries. It will draw on case material from diverse program experience, particularly in maternal-child heath. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 542 and SPH 542.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

Students will understand the connections and distinctions among ethics, law and public policy in health contexts, and should be able to reason critically about legal and policy influences on public health and health care. Several different approaches to ethical analysis are studied, as are brief introductions to policy-making processes and legal principles and structures in Canada. Special attention is paid to justification (rather than mere opinion or imposition) and the limits of ethics, laws and policies to identify or enforce the best practices in health contexts. Several problem areas (e.g. health care system reform, health research, organization and management ethics, human rights and multiculturalism) are examined in light of the theoretical foundations in pursuit of effective and justified health policy. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 543 and SPH 543.

★ 2 (fi 4)(VAR, 2-0-0)

Building on SPH 541- Public Health Practice and Professional Skills I, students continue to practice and strengthen professional competencies through working in teams to address complex public health scenarios. This course highlights the action implementation and evaluation phases of the assessment-planning-action-evaluation cycle, and emphasizes the knowledge, skills, and behaviors needed in inter/intra-organizational teamwork and collaboration, including: assessment of the implementation context - such as the political climate and political will - ethics and values in decision-making, financing of health initiatives in the Canadian context, budget cycles and accountability, economic evaluation and resource allocation considerations, and governance. Teams continue to build stakeholder assessment skills - who needs to be at the table and their roles and responsibilities and accountabilities; and project management skills - scoping the work, developing a resource plan, including budget, work plan, and evaluation plan, and developing an advocacy briefing note in support of their proposed initiative. Particular attention is given to the implications for, and impacts of, policy making on, Indigenous people and other equity seeking groups. SPH 546 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 541, SPH 562. Corequisite: SPH 537, SPH 563, or consent of instructor.

★ 1 (fi 4)(VAR, 2-0-0)

Building on SPH 541- Public Health Practice and Professional Skills I, students continue to practice and strengthen professional competencies through working in teams to address complex public health scenarios. This course highlights the action implementation and evaluation phases of the assessment-planning-action-evaluation cycle, and emphasizes the knowledge, skills, and behaviors needed in inter/intra-organizational teamwork and collaboration, including: assessment of the implementation context - such as the political climate and political will - ethics and values in decision-making, financing of health initiatives in the Canadian context, budget cycles and accountability, economic evaluation and resource allocation considerations, and governance. Teams continue to build stakeholder assessment skills - who needs to be at the table and their roles and responsibilities and accountabilities; and project management skills - scoping the work, developing a resource plan, including budget, work plan, and evaluation plan, and developing an advocacy briefing note in support of their proposed initiative. Particular attention is given to the implications for, and impacts of, policy making on, Indigenous people and other equity seeking groups. SPH 546 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 541, SPH 562. Corequisite: SPH 537, SPH 563, or consent of instructor.

★ 1 (fi 4)(VAR, 2-0-0)

Building on SPH 541- Public Health Practice and Professional Skills I, students continue to practice and strengthen professional competencies through working in teams to address complex public health scenarios. This course highlights the action implementation and evaluation phases of the assessment-planning-action-evaluation cycle, and emphasizes the knowledge, skills, and behaviors needed in inter/intra-organizational teamwork and collaboration, including: assessment of the implementation context - such as the political climate and political will - ethics and values in decision-making, financing of health initiatives in the Canadian context, budget cycles and accountability, economic evaluation and resource allocation considerations, and governance. Teams continue to build stakeholder assessment skills - who needs to be at the table and their roles and responsibilities and accountabilities; and project management skills - scoping the work, developing a resource plan, including budget, work plan, and evaluation plan, and developing an advocacy briefing note in support of their proposed initiative. Particular attention is given to the implications for, and impacts of, policy making on, Indigenous people and other equity seeking groups. SPH 546 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 541, SPH 562. Corequisite: SPH 537, SPH 563, or consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

Building on Leadership and Professional Practice I and II, students will work in interdisciplinary teams to analyze a complex public health challenge, propose strategies and interventions to address it, and design an implementation and evaluation strategy. Pre-requisites: SPH 530, 535, 536, 541, 546 and Specialization Required Courses.

Starting: 2023-09-01 SPH 547 - Public Health Practice Project

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

Building on Public Health Practice & Professional Skills I & II, students continue to practice and strengthen professional competencies by working in teams assigned to external partner organizations to address a complex public health challenge. Organizations' priority projects may emphasize any stage of the assessment-planning-action-evaluation cycle. This course emphasizes professional skills - effective teamwork, reflection and peer assessment, oral and written communication; and project management including terms of engagement, a project charter and work plan, and high-quality deliverables. SPH 547 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Pre-requisites: SPH 530, SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 537, SPH 541, SPH 546, SPH 562, SPH 563, or consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Financial structure of the health care system, Introduction to managerial accounting with special emphasis on the management of health care agencies. Principles of costing. Multiproduct and case mix measures. Resource use decisions, budgeting and control, and pricing analysis for health care organizations. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 550 and SPH 550.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

The aim of this course is for students to gain competencies in three areas: determinants of health and strategies to address these; ontologies, epistemologies and research designs relevant to public health research; knowledge mobilization and engaged scholarship. Sessions will usually comprise introductory interactive presentations and small/large group discussions. Class time and assignments are aimed at enhancing students' understanding, critical analysis and application of key concepts and selected issues related to Public Health, research methods used in Public Health and Knowledge translation.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

Climate change has severe and wide-sweeping consequences for humanity with important threats to human health and wellness. With health impacts ranging from heat-related deaths to infectious diseases (e.g., waterborne, foodborne, vector borne, and zoonotic diseases) to malnutrition to mental health to health service disruption and beyond, climate change is considered one of the biggest health challenges of the 21st century. This course focuses on how climate change is already impacting our health, and how we can diminish those impacts. Students will examine how past and future climate change hazards, exposures, and vulnerabilities shape health risks. Case studies will demonstrate how health equity, intersectionality, and social determinants of health can mediate or amplify risks. Students will apply vulnerability assessment tools to identify and prioritize effective and feasible adaptation and mitigation actions. Through discussion, teamwork, and real-world examples, students will apply principles of transdisciplinary, systems thinking, equity and justice, sustainability, complexity, Indigenous Peoples' Rights, and community engagement to not only understand climate change impacts on health but to also move into the solution space.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

Climate change and health is a rapidly emerging field with exponentially increasing research outputs and expanding areas of practice. Climate change topics increasingly demand the public's attention, including news headlines, local to international policies, images of increasing extreme weather events, climate strikes, government election platforms, and increasing international reports on climate change impacts. Climate change is a hot topic! Alongside this rapid pace of climate change developments is the urgency for health action and immediate attention. Therefore, this course explores the health dimensions of hot topics, emerging themes, and current events in climate change as they occur in real time around the world. Through the discussion of current global to local issues at the climate-health nexus, students will deepen their understanding of climate change and health research, policy, and practice. Discussion, teamwork, and projects will enable the application of climate change and health theory to real time climate change and health theory to real time climate change events. Prerequisite: SPH 556.

★ 1 (fi 2)(VAR, 1-0-0)

Public health needs a climate change action plan now. Human health is intertwined with the stability of our climate, making climate change a threat to any vision of a healthy future. Serving as the culminating and integrative experience of the Climate Change and Health Graduate Embedded Certificate, students will apply and expand knowledge gained throughout their coursework to engage in high-level inquiry focusing on climate change and health. Students will apply a climate change lens to health programs, policy, research, and decision-making, and explore how to integrate climate change dimensions into all health actions. Prerequisites: SPH 556 and SPH 557.

★ 1 (fi 2)(EITHER, 1-0-0)
There is no available course description.
★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

An exploration of concepts and theories used to explain why poor health and health inequities occur within and across populations, including Indigenous and other racialized populations (etiology), and interventions public health practitioners use to change complex systems to address factors that contribute to these problems. Etiologic topics include conceptions of health and wellness; population health vs. clinical care; historical and global trends in population mortality, morbidity, and health inequities; causal and systems thinking, and the impact of biological, behavioural, sociocultural, political-economic, and environmental factors on population health and health inequities. Intervention topics include advocacy, community and systems capacity building, and implementation of policies, and programs that support key public health functions - health promotion and protection, the prevention and control of infectious and chronic diseases and injury, and emergency preparedness and response, governance, infrastructure, financing and organization. Intersectoral partnership, collaborative action, and political will are reviewed to support health in all policies to improve public health. SPH 562 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530. Corequisites: SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 541, or consent of instructor.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

An exploration of concepts and theories used to explain why poor health and health inequities occur within and across populations, including Indigenous and other racialized populations (etiology), and interventions public health practitioners use to change complex systems to address factors that contribute to these problems. Etiologic topics include conceptions of health and wellness; population health vs. clinical care; historical and global trends in population mortality, morbidity, and health inequities; causal and systems thinking, and the impact of biological, behavioural, sociocultural, political-economic, and environmental factors on population health and health inequities. Intervention topics include advocacy, community and systems capacity building, and implementation of policies, and programs that support key public health functions - health promotion and protection, the prevention and control of infectious and chronic diseases and injury, and emergency preparedness and response, governance, infrastructure, financing and organization. Intersectoral partnership, collaborative action, and political will are reviewed to support health in all policies to improve public health. SPH 562 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530. Corequisites: SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 541, or consent of instructor.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

An exploration of concepts and theories used to explain why poor health and health inequities occur within and across populations, including Indigenous and other racialized populations (etiology), and interventions public health practitioners use to change complex systems to address factors that contribute to these problems. Etiologic topics include conceptions of health and wellness; population health vs. clinical care; historical and global trends in population mortality, morbidity, and health inequities; causal and systems thinking, and the impact of biological, behavioural, sociocultural, political-economic, and environmental factors on population health and health inequities. Intervention topics include advocacy, community and systems capacity building, and implementation of policies, and programs that support key public health functions - health promotion and protection, the prevention and control of infectious and chronic diseases and injury, and emergency preparedness and response, governance, infrastructure, financing and organization. Intersectoral partnership, collaborative action, and political will are reviewed to support health in all policies to improve public health. SPH 562 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530. Corequisites: SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 541, or consent of instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

An overview of evaluative thinking and practice in the assessment, planning, implementation and monitoring of public health interventions. Different types of evaluation are considered, including: needs assessment, process evaluation, monitoring of outputs and outcomes, impact assessment, and cost analysis. Evaluation approaches, steps, strategies, and rigour are explored. Consideration is given to how Indigenous and other minoritized populations' ways of knowing can be incorporated into the design and conduct of evaluation. The course addresses evaluation practice competencies that align with the Canadian Evaluation Society's competency framework. SPH 563 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 562 ,SPH 535, SPH 536, and SPH 541A, or consent of instructor. Corequisites: SPH 537, SPH 541B, and SPH 546, or consent of instructor.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

An overview of evaluative thinking and practice in the assessment, planning, implementation and monitoring of public health interventions. Different types of evaluation are considered, including: needs assessment, process evaluation, monitoring of outputs and outcomes, impact assessment, and cost analysis. Evaluation approaches, steps, strategies, and rigour are explored. Consideration is given to how Indigenous and other minoritized populations' ways of knowing can be incorporated into the design and conduct of evaluation. The course addresses evaluation practice competencies that align with the Canadian Evaluation Society's competency framework. SPH 563 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 562 ,SPH 535, SPH 536, and SPH 541A, or consent of instructor. Corequisites: SPH 537, SPH 541B, and SPH 546, or consent of instructor.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, 3-0-0)

An overview of evaluative thinking and practice in the assessment, planning, implementation and monitoring of public health interventions. Different types of evaluation are considered, including: needs assessment, process evaluation, monitoring of outputs and outcomes, impact assessment, and cost analysis. Evaluation approaches, steps, strategies, and rigour are explored. Consideration is given to how Indigenous and other minoritized populations' ways of knowing can be incorporated into the design and conduct of evaluation. The course addresses evaluation practice competencies that align with the Canadian Evaluation Society's competency framework. SPH 563 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 562 ,SPH 535, SPH 536, and SPH 541A, or consent of instructor. Corequisites: SPH 537, SPH 541B, and SPH 546, or consent of instructor.

★ 1.5 (fi 3)(EITHER, 1-0-0)
There is no available course description.
★ 3 (fi VAR)(EITHER, VARIABLE)

Content varies from year to year. Topics are announced prior to registration period. The student's transcript will carry a title descriptive of the content. May be repeated.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

A survey of health economic theory and empirical studies, topics and areas covered include: (1) demand, supply, and utilization; (2) production and costs; (3) resource allocation in health care labor markets; (4) selected facets of health care planning; (5) benefit cost analysis. The empirical studies examined in the course require an understanding of simple and multiple regression techniques. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 570 and SPH 570.

Starting: 2023-09-01 SPH 570 - Introduction to Health Care Economics

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

A required course for the Graduate Embedded Certificate in Health Economic Evaluation, this 3-credit course provides an introduction to health economic theory and its application to health-related topics. The areas covered include: (1) demand, supply, and utilization; (2) health production and cost of services; (3) societal resource allocation and policy decisions; (4) health insurance systems and selected facets of health planning; (5) determinants of health and equity; (6) health economic evaluation. No prior economics courses or experience required. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 570 and SPH 570.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to become effective managers and leaders in the health service organizations and health care systems. It facilitates this objective by providing a foundation for the acquisition of the knowledge of the managerial process through an analysis and understanding of the psychological, sociological and political basis of complex social systems, as well as providing a basis for acquiring conceptual and practical skills in the effective management and design of health service organizations and health care networks. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 580 and SPH 580.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 2-1S-0)

This course is intended to provide students with an exploration of what leaders actually do, and with an understanding of the skill-sets necessary for driving transformational change in an organization on a continuing basis. It is very clear that successful leaders must be able to effectively lead change, particularly in today's fast-paced health environment. As part of this course, you will find yourself quickly developing an understanding of the process of change, the reasons why there is such a range in the quality of change leadership, and your own personal approach to becoming a successful change leader. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 581 and SPH 581.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Develops a basic understanding of human resource trends and issues in public health organizations. Examines topics such as strategic health human resources; organizational effectiveness; healthy work environments; workplace culture; legal and policy frameworks; human resources planning and recruitment; selection, orientation, training, mentoring and career development; performance management and discipline; compensation and benefits; labour relations and collective bargaining; regulated health professionals; and other health human resources policy issues and challenges. Prerequisite: SPH 580 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 582 and SPH 582.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course examines the theoretical basis of the whole systems approach to organizational change and the advantages of this approach compared to traditional approaches. It overviews the range of whole systems methodologies available for organizational change initiatives. The course leads to an in-depth knowledge of a number of the whole systems methodologies that will prepare practitioners to make informed decisions regarding their appropriateness for application in specific organizations or organizational situations. It leads finally to an in-depth, hands-on working knowledge (and experience level) with one of the most utilized whole systems methodologies in today's organization development world, i.e., Appreciative Inquiry. Prerequisite: SPH 580 or SPH 581 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 583 and SPH 583.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

An introductory course that highlights injuries as a major and neglected public health problem. Leading causes of injuries, including motor vehicle, falls, fires, violence, drowning, occupational, and recreational will be addressed in informal lectures and class discussions. The biomechanics of injury and the structure of emergency medical systems will also be covered. Prevention strategies and evaluation of various interventions will be introduced. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 593 and SPH 593.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

An introduction to the theory of epidemiology with an emphasis on study design. Topics include the nature of epidemiologic reasoning, indices used to describe and measure health status, interpretation of studies, causation, descriptive studies, analytic studies, intervention studies, and ethics. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS/SPH 596 and SPH 597.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

The aim of this course is to promote an understanding of epidemiological methods and study designs and their application to improving human health, and is designed for students not specializing in epidemiology or biostatistics. Topics include measures of disease frequency, study design, bias, confounding, and assessing causation. A focus will be on critical review of epidemiologic studies through case studies. Students cannot receive credit for both PHS 596 and SPH 597. Prerequisite: Introductory statistics course or consent of Instructor. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 6 (fi 12)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Public health practice is an integral part of the MPH degree. The practicum is a full-time hands-on experience in a public health work setting. It provides the opportunity for students to integrate and synthesize public health philosophy, theory and practice through application and critical assessment. Students contribute to a community or organization's capacity to critically assess public health issues, and design, implement and evaluate strategic initiatives, while at the same time gaining confidence and skills as public health professionals. Normally, the final course of the MPH degree. Prerequisites: SPH 530, 535, 536, 541, 546, 547, and Specialization Required Courses.

Starting: 2023-09-01 SPH 598 - Public Health Practice Experience and Capping Project

★ 6 (fi 12)(VAR, VARIABLE)

This course incorporates an applied practice experience (APE) and an integrative learning experience (ILE). Students complete a field practicum that entails hands-on experience in a work setting relevant to public health. Students integrate and synthesize their cumulative knowledge of public health through application to and critical assessment of a specific problem in a specific setting. They contribute to community or organizational capacity to address current priorities, while gaining confidence and skills as public health professionals. SPH 598 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Normally completed in the final term of the degree except in approved circumstances. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 537, SPH 541, SPH 546, SPH 547, SPH 562, SPH 563, or consent of instructor. Students may take up to 3 units concurrently.

★ 3 (fi 12)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Public health practice is an integral part of the MPH degree. The practicum is a full-time hands-on experience in a public health work setting. It provides the opportunity for students to integrate and synthesize public health philosophy, theory and practice through application and critical assessment. Students contribute to a community or organization's capacity to critically assess public health issues, and design, implement and evaluate strategic initiatives, while at the same time gaining confidence and skills as public health professionals. Normally, the final course of the MPH degree. Prerequisites: SPH 530, 535, 536, 541, 546, 547, and Specialization Required Courses.

Starting: 2023-09-01 SPH 598A - Public Health Practice Experience and Capping Project

★ 3 (fi 12)(VAR, VARIABLE)

This course incorporates an applied practice experience (APE) and an integrative learning experience (ILE). Students complete a field practicum that entails hands-on experience in a work setting relevant to public health. Students integrate and synthesize their cumulative knowledge of public health through application to and critical assessment of a specific problem in a specific setting. They contribute to community or organizational capacity to address current priorities, while gaining confidence and skills as public health professionals. SPH 598 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Normally completed in the final term of the degree except in approved circumstances. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 537, SPH 541, SPH 546, SPH 547, SPH 562, SPH 563, or consent of instructor. Students may take up to 3 units concurrently.

★ 3 (fi 12)(VAR, VARIABLE)

Public health practice is an integral part of the MPH degree. The practicum is a full-time hands-on experience in a public health work setting. It provides the opportunity for students to integrate and synthesize public health philosophy, theory and practice through application and critical assessment. Students contribute to a community or organization's capacity to critically assess public health issues, and design, implement and evaluate strategic initiatives, while at the same time gaining confidence and skills as public health professionals. Normally, the final course of the MPH degree. Prerequisites: SPH 530, 535, 536, 541, 546, 547, and Specialization Required Courses.

Starting: 2023-09-01 SPH 598B - Public Health Practice Experience and Capping Project

★ 3 (fi 12)(VAR, VARIABLE)

This course incorporates an applied practice experience (APE) and an integrative learning experience (ILE). Students complete a field practicum that entails hands-on experience in a work setting relevant to public health. Students integrate and synthesize their cumulative knowledge of public health through application to and critical assessment of a specific problem in a specific setting. They contribute to community or organizational capacity to address current priorities, while gaining confidence and skills as public health professionals. SPH 598 is a required course for the degree of Master of Public Health in General Public Health. Normally completed in the final term of the degree except in approved circumstances. Prerequisites: SPH 530, SPH 535, SPH 536, SPH 537, SPH 541, SPH 546, SPH 547, SPH 562, SPH 563, or consent of instructor. Students may take up to 3 units concurrently.

★ 3 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

MPH students will complete a project where they demonstrate their ability to integrate and synthesize public health concepts, principles and theories and apply their critical thinking skills in a project of relevance to the field of public health. Typically completed in the final term of the MPH program. Prerequisites: SPH 598 Field Practicum.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

MPH students will complete a project where they demonstrate their ability to integrate and synthesize public health concepts, principles and theories and apply their critical thinking skills in a project of relevance to the field of public health. Typically completed in the final term of the MPH program. Prerequisites: SPH 598 Field Practicum.

★ 1.5 (fi 6)(VAR, VARIABLE)

MPH students will complete a project where they demonstrate their ability to integrate and synthesize public health concepts, principles and theories and apply their critical thinking skills in a project of relevance to the field of public health. Typically completed in the final term of the MPH program. Prerequisites: SPH 598 Field Practicum.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

An overview of the principles and methods underlying the analysis of health policy. Application of health policy principles to selected issues and problems in Canadian health policy and systems. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 600 and SPH 600.

★ 2 (fi 4)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

The course will provide a comparative analysis of models and practices across six countries that have universal health systems with some reference to selected other countries where innovative models exist. The first half of the course will focus on the foundations of health systems (Organization, Governance and Financing; Economics, Public/Private Models and System Performance; Human Resource Management and Demand/Utilization Management) to provide a grounding to understand the differentiating features of the six health systems. The second half will explore three themes of contemporary interest to the Canadian health system. These thematic areas will be primary health care, pharmaceutical policy and public health strategies.

★ 2 (fi 4)(EITHER, 0-2S-0)

An interdisciplinary seminar intended to prepare students with the knowledge and skills necessary to engage effectively with communities and the health system in research and practice. Students will explore the concepts of engaged scholarship and how these can be best applied in their field of expertise to promote research that is both relevant and of high quality. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 602 and SPH 602. All PhD students are required to complete this course. Students can only receive credit for SPH 602 or 607 and 610. Prerequisite: SPH 603 and SPH 604 or consent of the instructor.

★ 2 (fi 4)(EITHER, 0-2S-0)

An interdisciplinary seminar designed to explore communication in public health including: written and oral communication of research to scientific and lay audiences, grant proposal and manuscript writing, poster and oral presentations. All PhD students are required to complete this course. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 603 and SPH 603.

★ 2 (fi 4)(EITHER, 0-2S-0)

Exploration of current topics in public health research including: epidemiology, health service delivery, health policy, sociobehavioural approaches, occupational and environmental health. All PhD students are required to complete this course. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 604 and SPH 604.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

The course will introduce students interested in careers in health administration and policy development to relevant issues in health law and risk management in the context of the Canadian legal and public health care systems. It will start with a discussion of the Constitutional foundation of health law in Canada with an analysis of Canada's Federal political structure, Federal and Provincial jurisdictions in health care, and the influence of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Canada Health Act. It will introduce students to administrative structures and related law. The second part of the course will offer a practical exploration of issues that may confront health managers and policy makers, including medical negligence; informed consent; employment and labour law; contract law (e.g., procurement contracts); public health information; privacy and confidentiality; and regulation of health professions. Students will present papers on special topics in public health law such as infectious disease management, HIV/AIDS, vaccines, tobacco control, food-borne illnesses, intersections with criminal justice, Aboriginal peoples and public health, and genetics and public health. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 606 and SPH 605.

★ 1 (fi 2)(EITHER, 0-1S-0)

An introductory seminar intended to provide students with the knowledge and critical thinking skills necessary to conduct research that is relevant and credible to intended users. The course includes a theoretical overview of engaged scholarship, knowledge translation and related concepts, and practical examples of how these concepts and principles could be applied to a diversity of research topics and methods. This course is the first of two required seminars in Engaged Scholarship for Health for PhD students in the School of Public Health. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 607 and SPH 607. Students cannot receive credit for both SPH 602 and 607.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

A critical, interdisciplinary review of psychosocial health. Theoretical and methodological implications from a variety of disciplinary perspectives are considered. Prerequisite: SPH 501 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 608 and SPH 608. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)
There is no available course description.
★ 1 (fi 2)(EITHER, 0-1S-0)

This course will apply engaged scholarship concepts and principles to the development of the student's specific thesis research. This course is the second of two required seminars in Engaged Scholarship for Health for PhD students in the School of Public Health. Prerequisites: SPH 607, selection of thesis topic and methodology. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 608 and SPH 610. Students cannot receive credit for both SPH 602 and 610.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

Theoretical approaches and practical issues regarding the provision of health care in Canada with a focus on aboriginal, refugee and immigrant families. Human ecological models, health promotion, and ethical issues will be examined within a framework of cultural diversity. Pre and corequisite: SPH 501 or consent of instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HECOL 618 and SPH 618. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 618 and SPH 618. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-1)

Advanced biostatistical methods used to analyze epidemiologic data with an emphasis on multivariable regression. Topics include multiple regression, unconditional and conditional logistic regression and proportional hazards regression. Prerequisite: SPH 519 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 698 and SPH 619.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

A critical examination of intervention strategies, implementation, and research evidence in health promotion practice. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 602 and SPH 622. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

Theoretical understanding of qualitative and community-based research designs, including phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, biography and case study. Methods of data collection such as interviews, focus groups and participant observation. Strategies for data analysis and dissemination. Pre or corequisite: SPH 503 or consent of instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 603 and SPH 623. Credit may not be obtained for both HECOL 603 and SPH 623. May contain alternate delivery sections; refer to the Tuition and Fees page in the University Regulations section of the Calendar.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Deals with the application of program evaluation for the health and social sciences fields. Emphasis is on the theory of program evaluation using various models, research design, and the application of these concepts by performing a program evaluation. Discussions will be centered around the ethics, reliability, validity, process, outcomes, and implications of various program evaluation models. Current and relevant publications in public health sciences complete this course. Prerequisite: SPH 630 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 631 and SPH 631.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

Advanced principles, concepts, processes and strategies for the communication of risks to human health posed by potentially hazardous agents or situations. Topics include communication and risk communication theory, the risk communication process, and the role of risk communication as part of an integrated risk management strategy, as well as an in depth examination of empirical research methods and specific risk communication issues. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both HPS 616 and SPH 633.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

The aim of this course is to enable students to increase their understanding of historical and current determinants of global health and of the interventions to reduce global health inequities. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 640 and SPH 640.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This introductory course to global health project development familiarizes students with the logical frame planning approach. This planning method is a must by many international development agencies, e.g. the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the World Bank and many others. Through various stages of problem analysis, objective analysis and the development of the logical frame with planning indictors and assumptions, course participants learn how to apply this method in the context of a developing country. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 641 and SPH 641.

★ 1 (fi 2)(EITHER, 1-0-0)
There is no available course description.
★ 1.5 (fi 3)(EITHER, 1-0-0)
There is no available course description.
★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

The application of economic principles to the evaluation of health care practices. The use of various outcome measures. Cost effectiveness and cost benefit analysis. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 671 and SPH 671.

Starting: 2023-09-01 SPH 671 - Introduction to Health Economic Evaluation

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

A required course for the Graduate Embedded Certificate in Health Economic Evaluation, this 3-credit course provides an introduction to health economic evaluation. Methodological areas covered include: (1) types of economic evaluation (including cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis); (2) defining the target population; (3) comparators; (4) the perspective of the evaluation; (5) time preference and discounting; (6) measuring and valuing health; (7) resource use and costs; (8) uncertainty and probabilistic analysis; (9) equity considerations; and (10) analysis and reporting of economic evaluations. Students will be introduced to Indigenous perspectives on measuring and valuing health, and those of other equity-seeking groups, and will consider the implications for health economic evaluations. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with current best practices for conducting health economic evaluations in Canada. Students will also learn how to construct basic decision analytic models, providing practical experience in applying these methods. No prior economics courses or experience required. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 671 and SPH 671.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

An overview of the nature, science and practicalities of health technology assessment (HTA), which can then be used as the basis for further work and research. Issues covered will include health care technologies and their management, methods used for assessment, sources of information and application of HTA findings to policy and administrative decisions. Emphasis placed on assessments that have been undertaken by national and regional agencies in Canada and other countries to provide information to governments, health care providers and others. Diagnostic, screening, rehabilitation and information technologies will be considered. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 673 and SPH 673.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Health care marketing and planning involves the analysis, evaluation, implementation and control of carefully formulated programs designed to bring about voluntary exchanges with a target audience for the purpose of achieving organizational objectives. The purpose of this course is to provide the students with a general understanding of the contribution of marketing and strategic planning to the effective management of health care institutions and public health programs. The course facilitates this objective by providing a foundation for the acquisition of marketing concepts, terms, and skills relevant for understanding the role that marketing and planning play in health care institutions and health systems, the design of health care programs, and as a vehicle for social change. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 680 and SPH 680.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

This course is designed to provide self and 360 degree assessment of individual characteristics that influence leadership styles, strategies and outcomes, e.g., emotional intelligence, personality types, learning styles, etc. When the assessments are complete the students will then develop their own leadership strategy that takes into account the findings from the assessments, i.e., develop their own customized leadership strategy that capitalizes on strengths, eliminates or at least minimizes weaknesses, uncovers potential blind spots when serving as a leader, and that considers fit between person and position. Prerequisite: SPH 582 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 682 and SPH 682.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

The primary objective is to provide students with the background knowledge and methodological skills to be discriminating and informed users of health-related quality of life measures and interpreters of HRQL evidence. Topics include uses of HRQL measures, various systems for classifying HRQL measures, methodologies for the assessment of reliability, validity, responsiveness, and interpretability, and conceptualization of major approaches for the development of HRQL measures (including psychometric, clinical, and economics and decision analytic approaches). Examples of different types of measures and their application in a wide variety of clinical areas are included. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 685 and SPH 685.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

Methods for efficiently and critically identifying, appraising, and applying the health sciences literature are learned in an interactive group setting. Topics include studies of prognosis, diagnosis, therapy, causation outcomes research, economic analysis, and systematic reviews. Prerequisite: SPH 596 or 597 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 693 and SPH 693.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

An advanced course focusing on the review of current epidemiologic knowledge of injuries relating to the leading causes of injury, morbidity, and mortality. Strategies for data acquisition and use in injury research will be introduced. Tools will be presented that will allow students to develop the practical skills needed to design, implement, and evaluate injury prevention programs. Prerequisite: SPH 593. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 695 and SPH 695.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Epidemiologic methods related to specific study designs and general issues relating to the conduct of epidemiologic studies at an advanced level. Topics covered include confounding, interaction, misclassification, matching, ecologic studies, justification of the odds ratio in case-control studies, and age-period-cohort analysis. Prerequisite: SPH 519 and 596 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 696 and SPH 696.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-2S/2-0)

This course provides a broad introduction to the knowledge needed to investigate and control infectious diseases. It covers the description, causes and modeling of epidemic and endemic infections, as well as intervention and prevention strategies. Selected infectious diseases are used as case studies. These provide understanding of the natural history, evolution, investigation, methods of control, and the costs and benefits of interventions in a legal and ethical policy context. Prerequisites: SPH 596, or equivalent, or permission of Instructor.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Administrative health data have been used widely for decision making and research in Canada and the world. Analysis of these data required knowledge of data features and unique analytical skills since data are not collected for research purposes. This course will help hone students data management and analytical skills to answer research questions using health systems data. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 699 and SPH 699.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 3-0-0)

Advanced biostatistical methods for the design and analysis with a special emphasis on applications for health sciences research. Topics include multinomial and ordinal logistic regression, Poisson and negative binomial regression, longitudinal and correlated data analysis methods (including generalized estimating equations and random-effects models), advanced survival analysis, principal component and factor analyses, and propensity score analysis. Prerequisites: SPH 619 or permission of the Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 798 and SPH 719.

★ 3 (fi 6)(EITHER, 0-3S-0)

This is an advanced epidemiology methods course with emphasis on causal inference. Topics covered include causal inference in observational studies, causal diagrams, effect modification, interaction, selection and measurement bias in causal modelling, propensity score analysis, inverse probability weighting and marginal structural models, standardization and the parametric g-formula, instrumental variable estimation, and mediation analysis. The overall goal of this course is to provide an understanding of concepts and practical applications of causal inference and prepare graduates to understand and apply these concepts in epidemiological research. Prerequisites: SPH 619 and 696 or consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both PHS 766 and SPH 766.